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International Business

Course Descriptions

ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I (4.00 SH). A two-semester study of the basic principles and concepts underlying the measurement of financial activity, and the preparation and use of financial statements. Among the topics will be basic accounting theory, transaction analyses, income determination, asset and liability valuation.

ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II (4.00 SH). A continuation of the basic accounting concepts, plus issues that relate to the financial management of a company, cost behavior, cost control, capital budgeting and profit planning. Prerequisite: ACC 201 for ACC 202.

BA 140 Introduction to Business (4.00 SH). An introduction to the nature of work and organizations. The course will explore the functions of managers in work environments, and the issues that shape contemporary management such as global competition and information technology. This course cannot be taken for credit if you have received credit for BA 310 (or are currently enrolled). This course is not open to junior or seniors except by permission.

BA 160 Personal Financial Decisions (4.00 SH). An introductory course on the basics of financial decision making and personal finance. Topics will include basic accounting concepts, investment alternatives, budgeting, and the nature of risk and insurance. This course does not carry credit for any major in the Department of Economics and Business. Sophomore standing is recommended.

BA 225 Management Information Systems (4.00 SH). The course provides a basic understanding of how organizations develop, use, manage, and secure their information systems. The course examines the impact of information systems at the strategic and operational levels of an organization. Key system applications, such as electronic commerce and enterprise information systems, are examined as well as the technological infrastructure that supports them. Prerequisites: ACC 201 or BA 140 or ECO 150.

BA 305 Marketing (4.00 SH). A study of the process by which products or services are brought to targeted consumers. The discussion includes consumer behavior, formation of a marketing plan and strategy, and marketing ethics. The approach is from the position of a business; however, consumer issues and concerns will also be discussed. Prerequisites: BA 140 or SCSM 101 or ECO 150.

BA 310 Organizations and Management (4.00 SH). A course that studies the behavior of people in a work organization. Topics include motivation, leadership, group processes, job and organizational design, communications, effectiveness and ethics in the workplace. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

BA 350 Finance (4.00 SH). A study of the financial principles involved in operating a business enterprise. Topics include asset management, creditor relationships, owners’ equities, budgeting for future capital needs and cash requirements, and the management of income and expenses. Prerequisites: ECO 150, ACC 202, ECO 220 (or equivalent), and MTH 131 or MTH 150.

BA 365 International Finance (4.00 SH). An introduction to theories and policies concerning international trade, open economy macroeconomics, and international finance. Topics include traditional and modern theories of international trade, trade policies in advanced and developing countries, the balance of payments, fixed and flexible exchange rates, arbitrage and hedging, monetary and fiscal policies, currency areas, international debt, and the global capital market. Prerequisites: ECO 150.

BA 410 Global Marketing Management (4.00 SH). An introduction to the complexities of marketing goods and services to international consumers. The environment of international marketing will be addressed from conceptual and applied perspectives. Topics include the various economic, social, political and legal dimensions confronted in international marketing. Prerequisites: junior standing and BA 305.

BA 601 Strategic Management (4.00 SH). A capstone course that focuses on general management skills involved in choosing an organizational strategy, committing critical resources to implementation, and appropriately reevaluating that strategy as internal and external organizational environments change. The course integrates the major business functions using top management’s generalist view. The primary method of instruction is case analysis. Prerequisites: BA 305, BA 310, ECO 220, and senior standing.

ECO 150 Economic Reasoning (ST) (4.00 SH). Fundamental economic concepts and theories of supply and demand, resource allocation, taxation, international trade, externalities, public goods, market models, and labor markets. An emphasis on applications in both public policy and individual decision making will be recurrent throughout the course. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

FR 302 French Adv Conv/Comp II (4.00 SH). A continuation of the skills and emphases stated for FR 301. Prerequisite: FR 301 or permission of instructor.

FR 303 Commercial French (4.00 SH). An introduction to the technical vocabulary of international business, including the writing of business letters and the translation of magazine articles using the computer. Authentic documents and videos are used. The course also studies advertising images, immigration, and business ethics in their cultural and historical context. A competency examination is given at the end of the course. Prerequisite: FR 302 or consent of instructor.

IC 101 The World of Language (ST) (4.00 SH). A study of the world of language from a multicultural perspective. Students will explore language origins, first and second language acquisition, and cross-cultural differences. The course will also cover such topics as body language, gesture, the relationship between language and perception, anthropological foundations, attempts to create a “universal language,” computer language, artificial intelligence, and animal communication. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

IC 102 Reading The World (ST) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the study of culture in countries where French, German, and Spanish are spoken. The course uses texts in the broadest sense, including literature, film, advertising, and cultural theory, in order to explore culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. This course examines the specific content and form of these four kinds of texts and the role of gender, race, and social class in shaping them. Special emphasis is given to texts by and about women, minorities, and the Third World. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

IFS 170 Introd Religion in the World (RP) (4.00 SH). Despite a huge diversity of individual positions on religion, it remains a universal and highly influential human activity. This course examines the narratives, rituals, symbols, moralities, and ultimate goals of the world’s religious communities. Particular attention is given to concepts and tools for understanding and analyzing religious behavior as an expression of human experience. Meets Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP).

IFS 171 Religion in the Western World (RP) (4.00 SH). The Western World is dominated by the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course inspects the contents and the histories of these traditions as well as other less well-known traditions such as Zoroastrianism, indigenous traditions of Africa and America, and the New Religious Movements of the modern era. Meets Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP).

IFS 172 Religions from India (RP) (4.00 SH). Hinduism and Buddhism are the major, but not the only, religious traditions to have emerged from the Indian sub-continent. This course studies the histories, narratives, rituals, scriptures, concepts, and meditative practices of the religions of India, including their increasing influence in our own society. Meets Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP).

IFS 173 Religion in China (RP) (4.00 SH). Religious practices in China are a mixture of Daoism, Confucianism, Chinese Buddhism, and folk traditions, although Christianity and Islam are also present. The interactions of these traditions through China’s long history is a fascinating insight into the human behaviors that we call “religion.” Meets Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP).

MTH 131 Applied Calculus (QR) (4.00 SH). A one-semester study of applications of differential and integral calculus with emphasis on polynomials, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, business and economics applications. This course is for individuals with a good high school background in mathematics. This course does not provide the background for a student to continue on to Calculus II. Not available to students who have credit for MTH 150, MTH 152, or MTH 250. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 150 Calculus I (QR) (4.00 SH). This course will focus on the fundamentals of differential calculus. Topics considered include functions, limits, continuous functions, differentiation and integration of functions with one real variable, applications of differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will be introduced to some basic calculus proofs. This course is suggested for all students who expect to continue for any advanced degree including finance, law, and medicine. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 152 Calculus II (QR) (4.00 SH). This course will focus on the fundamentals of integral calculus, including techniques and applications of integration. Other topics include infinite series and introductory topics from differential equations. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 150 or the permission of the instructor. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 250 Calculus III (QR) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the calculus of several variables. Topics include the geometry of three-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 152. (Offered Fall semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

PS 104 International Relations (ST) (4.00 SH). A study of politics among states and other actors who affect global relations. Once establishing a background in the concepts used to analyze world politics, students will use these concepts to explore the Cold War era, the end of that system, and several pertinent international issues in the areas of security, economics, and the environment. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PS 431 International Law & Organization (4.00 SH). A study of selected international institutions that have been constructed to address challenges faced by the world’s states. The course will introduce the student to several theories of international cooperation and explore the validity of these approaches in explaining behavior in the United Nations system (which consists of many international organizations). Students will leave the course with an understanding of the structures of these organizations, as well as a sense of how and why they work and sometimes fail to work. Topical areas will include peacekeeping, arms control and disarmament (e.g., nuclear weapons, biological and chemical warfare), development and trade, social and humanitarian issues (e.g., refugees, drug trafficking, transnational crime), and legal issues (e.g., war criminals, asylum). Prerequisite: PS 104 or permission of instructor.

SOC 105 Cultural Anthropology (HC) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the perspectives, methods and topics of study of cultural anthropology. Central focus is on cultural universals of language, religion and values and the cultural stances of ethnocentrism and cultural relativism. Emphasis on contemporary indigenous peoples, and especially Native Americans, as they encounter and assimilate into commercial, global-scale societies. We also discuss the roles and responsibilities of anthropologists as ethnographers, including issues of authority, methodological rigor, objectivity and advocacy. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

SPA 302 Spanish Adv Conv/Comp II (4.00 SH). A continuation of the skills and emphases stated for SPA 301. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 303 Commercial Spanish (4.00 SH). An introduction to the technical vocabulary of international business, including the writing of business letters and the translation of magazine articles using the computer. Authentic documents and videos are used. The course also examines advertising images, immigration, and business ethics in their cultural and historical context. A competency examination will be given at the end of the course. Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of instructor.

 

What can you do with an International Business degree?

Imagine yourself an International Business expatriate worker, international economist, international trade specialist, import compliance specialist, or cultural adviser.