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Environmental Studies

Course Descriptions

Environmental Studies Courses


ENV 201 Contemporary Environmental Issues (4.00 SH). This course investigates complex, real-world environmental issues facing our world today. Students will use case studies to explore environmental issues from multi-disciplinary perspectives and contexts including scientific, economic, political, social, historical, and cultural. Stakeholder identification and analysis, environmental justice, and risk assessment are additional themes considered in this communication-intensive course. A major component of this course will be a project in which students will have the opportunity to engage in in-depth research on the many nuanced perspectives, positions, and stances of a specific environmental issue. Students will communicate findings and advocate for a particular viewpoint as well as suggest possible solutions. Research projects may include topics such as climate change, hydraulic fracking, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction, deforestation, water and air pollution, natural resource distribution, and sustainable food supplies.

 

Supporting Courses


ART 105 Art and Nature (VP) (4.00 SH). This course takes an in-depth look at the natural world through art. Students explore a variety of subjects from butterflies to birds; seedpods to sea shells; the microscopic to the expanse of landscapes. Content and themes ranging from more scientific to the artistic. Primary techniques are basic drawing and painting using simple and portable materials. The course revolves around the creation of a field journal/sketchbook. More involved projects spin off assignments from the sketchbook. Students can expect to work on location/campus and at the biology department’s Field Station and Nature Trail. Our studio is the great outdoors. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

ART 120 Sculpture and Science (VP) (4.00 SH). This course will explore the intersection of art and science through a variety of sculptural projects inspired by scientific disciplines. A background in science is not required; the subject matter, processes and tools of both natural and social sciences are used as a framework for making art. Emphasis on experimentation, critical thinking, collaboration and problem-solving. A range of three-dimensional materials and processes will be utilized throughout the course. Development of concept through the study of artists combining science and art. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

ART 200 Basic Studio Art 3D (VP) (4.00 SH). An introductory class for students to explore the physical and visual properties of three-dimensional form. Students will work with a variety of materials such as plaster, balsa wood, paper, foam, cardboard, and found objects. Problem-solving projects will address aspects of design, technique and process, presentation, function and innovation in the creating of physical objects in space. Traditional and contemporary artists working in three-dimensional media are shown to illustrate project themes. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

ART 208 Intro to Sculpture (VP) (4.00 SH). This course is an introduction to utilizing sculpture as a three-dimensional vehicle for creative expression. The physical, spatial, and thematic properties of sculptural media are addressed through course projects. A range of materials and processes will be utilized in the course and may include wood, plaster, wax, metal, fabric, found materials, casting, site-specific, and installation. The course is designed for all skill levels. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

BA 220 Statistics (4.00 SH). An introductory course in the analysis and interpretation of quantitative data. Attention is given to the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, sampling, introductory probability theory, and hypothesis testing. Real world applications are used with computer software for statistical analysis. Not available to students with credit in BIO 206, MTH 335, PSY 201, PS 301, SSC 251, or SSC 252. Prerequisite: MTH 130 or 131 (or concurrent enrollment in MTH 131). (Also listed as ECO 220.)

BC 150 Digital Media Essentials (4.00 SH). This course provides fundamental for building best practices skills when using smartphones and other consumer-based products to produce digital media content to document and share one’s story or the story of an academic or professional project. Students learn how to critically review aesthetics of quality digital photography, audio and video and transition from critiquing to producing original content. The student will share the content via social media and other platforms while creating materials for a digital portfolio. This course requires you to create and maintain a professional presence on social media. You will share positions and experiences publically with an online audience. (Also listed as DJ 150).

BC 251 Single Camera Video Production (4.00 SH). This course introduces the student to the fundamentals and best practices of single-camera video production. Students obtain experience in pre-production, production and post-production utilizing digital video cameras and digital video editing. They also apply fundamentals for audio and lighting in productions while operating in our cable TV operations and with online video productions with WCN 24/7. Lab required.

BIO 206 Biostatistics & Experim Design (QR) (4.00 SH). An introductory course in experimental design and data analysis designed to encourage an understanding and appreciation of the role of experimentation, hypothesis testing, and data analysis in biology. The course will emphasize principles of experimental design, methods of data collection, exploratory data analysis, and the use of graphical and statistical tools commonly used by biologists to analyze data. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 201. Offered every semester. Meets Quantitative Reasoning (QR) IP

COM 203 Professional Presentations (4.00 SH). This course offers students the opportunity to develop presentations in their field (business, public relations, education, etc.).

COM 207 Business and Professional Com (4.00 SH). An analysis of communication in organizations, this course material focuses on interviewing skills, office communication media and choice-making, and sensitivity to evolving standards of “appropriate” behavior in the workplace. A variety of communication contexts are examined, including: interviews; written, electronic, and oral correspondence; and meetings, lunches, and parties. Intercultural theories and practice will receive special attention, and be explored in depth.

COM 225 Communication Ethics (ST) (4.00 SH). This course is designed to introduce the interrelationship of communication and free speech. The course will provide the opportunities to understand ethical communication in various contexts, assess weaknesses and strengths as an ethical communicator, and apply theories of communication ethics to the major course of study. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

COM 301 Applied Social Media (4.00 SH). This course allows the student the ability to examine how organizations can effectively use social media to communicate with various constituencies. Not only will there be opportunity to learn about social media theory but the application of this theory will be an integral part of the course experience.

DJ 150 Digital Media Essentials (4.00 SH). This course provides fundamental for building best practices skills when using smartphones and other consumer-based products to produce digital media content to document and share one’s story or the story of an academic or professional project. Students learn how to critically review aesthetics of quality digital photography, audio and video and transition from critiquing to producing original content. The student will share the content via social media and other platforms while creating materials for a digital portfolio. This course requires you to create and maintain a professional presence on social media. You will share positions and experiences publically with an online audience. (Also listed as BC 150).

DJ 201 Journalism I (4.00 SH). News reporting and writing, focusing on developing journalistic style and news judgment. Students will learn techniques of researching, interviewing, quoting, editing, beginning makeup and design, and rewriting the “hand­out,” or news release. This course also includes an introduction to press law, ethics and broadcast news. All students are expected to submit stories for print consideration. Prerequisite: successful completion of WRI 111. (Also listed as WRI 201).

ECO 220 Statistics (4.00 SH). An introductory course in the analysis and interpretation of quantitative data. Attention is given to the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, sampling, introductory probability theory, and hypothesis testing. Real world applications are used with computer software for statistical analysis. Not available to students with credit in BIO 206, MTH 335, PSY 201, PS 301, SSC 251, or SSC 252. Prerequisite: MTH 130 or 131 (or concurrent enrollment in MTH 131). (Also listed as BA 220.)

ENG 130 Native American Lit & Film (HC) (4.00 SH). ENG 101-199 Studies in English, American, world or comparative literature, or in specific literary genres and themes. Individual sections experiment with different approaches and topics. The times and a brief description of each course is provided each semester. These courses are designed primarily for non-English majors. More than one ENG 101–199 may be taken for credit, as long as each course is different. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

ENG 434 The Romantics (4.00 SH). ENG 401-451 - These seminars study literary texts from several critical and theoretical stances. The courses help students develop strategies for assessing the ways that meaning becomes evident in texts, in readers, and in writers. In addition to reading and interpreting texts within contexts, the 400s seminars regard works through or in the light of perspectives offered by critical theories. Not only do studetns in these seminars complete a higher degree of coreative and critical thinking, but they also participate more fully in leading the courses. The inquiry into theory, and when appropiate, its application, stresses independent assessment, peer evaluation, and assertion of ethical choices as they pertain to meaning and contexts. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENG 240, ENG 250, and one ENG 300.

ES 160 Concepts Environmental Science (SD) (4.00 SH). An investigation of the effect of humans on the Earth’s environment and on the other species that inhabit our planet. The course will look at the impact that an increasing human population has on the resource utilization, pollution production, habitat degradation, and the extinction of species. It will include a brief look at the policies and laws that specifically relate to environmental problems. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

ES 170 Project-Based Environmental Sci(SD) (4.00 SH). A survey of the major environmental issues facing our planet, with an in-depth focus on one environmental issue of local/regional interest. The course emphasizes the science of environmental issues but also explores the social, political, and economical factors that are involved. The first half of the course involves traditional lab and field experiences, while the laboratory portion of the second half of the course is dedicated to a research project related to the environmental issue of local/regional interest.

ES 170C C:Project-Based Envir Science (SD) (4.00 SH). A survey of the major environmental issues facing our planet, with an in-depth focus on one environmental issue of local/regional interest. The course emphasizes the science of environmental issues but also explores the social, political, and economical factors that are involved. The first half of the course involves traditional lab and field experiences, while the laboratory portion of the second half of the course is dedicated to a research project related to the environmental issue of local/regional interest.

GEO 101 World Geography (ST) (4.00 SH). This course in world geography is intended to give the student the opportunity to gain an understanding of the nature of geographic study, the physical planet on which we live, and the multiple ways people have organized themselves culturally, economically, politically, and physically across the globe.

HIS 228 Disease in US History (HC) (4.00 SH). History 228 is an introductory level history course which seeks to provide, for students of all majors, the opportunity to study the nature, course and impact of disease on and in the history of the United States. Attention also will be given to the shifting definitions and perceptions of disease. The majority of the semester will address the history of disease chronologically from colonial settlement through the present. The final weeks of the class will be devoted to the study of particular disease histories as detailed case studies of previously identified patterns.

HIS 245 19th Century Europe (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the political, social, economic, and diplomatic background of Europe from the Napoleonic Era to the close of the century. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 281 Africa to 1800 (HC) (4.00 SH). A survey of African history from the earliest times until 1800. The course examines major political, economic and cultural developments across the continent, including human origins, the great civilizations of the first millennium, and the slave trade. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 314 Disease in US History (4.00 SH). This course seeks to provide advanced students of history the opportunity to study the nature, course, and impact of diseases on and in the history of the United States. Attention will also be given to the definition and perception of disease and change over time in both. After reviewing the history of disease across the whole of U.S. history, the course will examine the nature, course, and impact of a series of particular diseases in substantial depth along with the historiography of those diseases.

MJ 150 Digital Media Essentials (4.00 SH). This course provides fundamental for building best practices skills when using smartphones and other consumer-based products to produce digital media content to document and share one’s story or the story of an academic or professional project. Students learn how to critically review aesthetics of quality digital photography, audio and video and transition from critiquing to producing original content. The student will share the content via social media and other platforms while creating materials for a digital portfolio. This course requires you to create and maintain a professional presence on social media. You will share positions and experiences publically with an online audience. (Also listed as BC 150).

MJ 201 Journalism I (4.00 SH). News reporting and writing, focusing on developing journalistic style and news judgment. Students will learn techniques of researching, interviewing, quoting, editing, beginning makeup and design, and rewriting the “hand­out,” or news release. This course also includes an introduction to press law, ethics and broadcast news. All students are expected to submit stories for print consideration. Prerequisite: successful completion of WRI 111. (Also listed as WRI 301).

MTH 135 Concepts of Statistics (QR) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the concepts of statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical summaries of data, confidence intervals and significance tests about hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding and interpretation of data and statistics. Not available to students who have credit for BA/ECO 220, PSY 201, SSC 251, BIO 206. (Offered Spring semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 335 Statistics (4.00 SH). An introduction to statistics. Topics include exploratory data analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics. Both classical, and bootstrapping and randomization approaches to inferential analysis are taken. Prerequisites: C- or better in MTH 152 and in MTH 241. (Offered Fall semester.)

PHI 230 Environmental Ethics (RP) (4.00 SH). Beginning with an examination of the nature of ethics in general, this course will explore a variety of theoretical positions on subjects such as the philosophy of nature, animal rights, deep ecology, eco-feminism, and global justice. One guiding theme will be the difference between the “anthropocentric” and an “eco-centric” attitude. Meets Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement

PR 101 Princ/Practices Public Rel (ST) (4.00 SH). A concept course which will make students familiar with the background and content of public relations management and help them understand the nature of managerial and ethical responsibilities of public relations practitioners. Attention will be given to the codes of ethics and enforcement processes of national societies of public relations professionals. The primary focus will be on management’s critical areas of accountability: the conceptualization and specification of the tasks and responsibilities which define the nature, scope and warranty of public relations activity. The course also will provide an overview of the various sectors of public relations such as public affairs, community relations, employee relations, financial and shareholder relations, consumer relations, international relations, crisis management and issues management. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PS 242 Environmental Policy & Politics (4.00 SH). This course explores “the environment” as a focus of public policy, an issue in political debate, and a basis for thinking about the purposes of political life. It reviews some of the classic readings in environmentalism, considers domestic and international policy approaches to major issues such as climate change, clean air and water, and sustainable development, and explores the ways in which thinking “environmentally” challenges our standard assumptions about policy-making and political life. Prerequisite: PS 101 or consent of instructor.

PSY 201 Experimental Design and Statistics (4.00 SH). An introduction to experimental research design, methods and statistics for the behavioral sciences. This course includes research ethics training, APA style writing instruction, and data analysis. Students propose research, do peer review, collect and analyze date, and present the results through laboratory modules and term research projects. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

SSC 252 Data Analysis for Soc Sci (QR) (4.00 SH). This class covers some introductory but powerful statistical techniques for analyzing and interpreting social science data. Students will use both descriptive and inferential statistics, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various statistical methods. They will also develop skills in presenting and interpreting statistical charts, graphs and tables. There is no formal prerequisite, but SSC 251, PS 301 or other exposure to research methods is recommended. Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

WRI 210 Intro to Creative and Pro Writing (4.00 SH). In this course, students will give their attention to the craft of writing by advancing their understanding of creative nonfiction and professional feature writing. Students will learn to critique their peers’ work in order to advance the class’s understanding of the editing process and the genres in which we are working. Having gained knowledge and confidence through these processes, students will begin to write convincingly about the art of writing. Over the course of the term, each student will write 2 or 3 creative nonfiction essays and 2 or 3 professional feature stories. These essays and stories will be modeled by the examples in the textbooks that we read and discuss. Regularly, students will submit drafts of their work to the class for discussion in a workshop format. For each draft submitted to the workshop, 3 students will be assigned the task of writing a thoughtful critique.

WRI 301 Journalism I (4.00 SH). News reporting and writing, focusing on developing journalistic style and news judgment. Students will learn techniques of researching, interviewing, quoting, editing, beginning­ makeup and design, and rewriting the “hand­out,” or news release. This course also includes an introduction to press law, ethics and broadcast news. All students are expected to submit stories for print consideration. Prerequisite: WRI 210.

WRI 351 Creative Non-Fiction (4.00 SH). Creative Non-Fiction takes as its premise the core of all writing-narrative structure and imagery. In non-fiction, structure becomes plastic and changeable according to a writer’s goals. Students will explore ways to create imagery-rich text. Students will read a wide selection in this genre and analyze what individual writers have done and how they’ve done it. Prerequisite: WRI 210.

WRI 352 Career Writing (4.00 SH). A course in the various types of practical writing required in the workplace. Prerequisite: WRI 210.

WRI 358 Technical Writing (4.00 SH). Throughout the ages, writing has always been mediated by the medium in which the words appear. With the advent of computers, in particular the Internet, the medium has shifted from paper-based to computer-based. We are in danger of losing the subtlety of language in the speed of technology and globalism. Instant messaging, e-mail, Web pages and other forms of computer-mediated communication are changing how we communicate with one another. It is important to emphasize that words must still be carefully crafted and writers must consider both the connotation and denotation of the words they choose. Because these documents will be technical in nature, they’ll contain graphs, charts, and a wide variety of visual elements as well as text. Prerequisite: WRI 210.

 

What can you do with an Environmental Studies degree?

Imagine yourself an environmental consultant, environmental writer, environmental lawyer, conservation proponent, or sustainability analyst.