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Nursing

Course Descriptions

BIO 135 Foundations of Anatomy and Physiology I (4 SH). This course is an introductory course that covers the structure, metabolism, chemical make-up, cellular structure, tissues, movement, support, coordination and control of the human body.  Students will gain specific knowledge of anatomical terminology and the way in which the body functions as a balanced system.  The structures and roles of the nervous, sensory and endocrine systems are covered. This course includes lab time for the student to visualize and apply learned material. This course is required as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum. A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course. This course does not fulfill any requirement for any major or minor program within the Division of Biological, Chemical, and Environmental Sciences. Pre-requisites: none.

BIO 136 Foundations of Anatomy and Physiology II (4 SH). This course is the second part of the Anatomy and Physiology course that covers cardiac, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive body systems. The student will gain specific knowledge of anatomical terminology and the way in which the body functions as a balanced system. This course includes lab time for the student to visualize and apply learned material.  This course is required as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum. A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course.   This course does not fulfill any requirement for any major or minor program within the Division of Biological, Chemical, and Environmental Sciences. Pre-requisites: Foundations of Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 135).

BIO 137 Foundations of Microbiology (BIO 4 SH). This course is an introductory course designed for nursing students. Topics covered include cellular structure, microbes and antimicrobial agents, genetics, epidemiology, infectious diseases and parasites.  This course includes lab time for the student to visualize and apply learned material. This course is required as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum. A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course. This course does not fulfill any requirement for any major or minor program within the Division of Biological, Chemical, and Environmental Sciences. This course meets the Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD). Pre-requisites: none.

WRI 111 Introduction to College Writing (4 SH). This course concentrates on the skills of discovering, selecting, and developing ideas. Students will learn how to research topics, organize and develop their thoughts, and revise and edit their writing with attention to grammar and style. Students will develop their ability to analyze, summarize, and argue. Through these skills, they will learn strategies for effectively developing and expressing ideas to different audiences. As they research, students will develop their ability to use a variety of standard print and electronic sources. Required of all first-year students. Students will take 111 either in the Fall or the Spring Semester. A minimum passing grade of C- is required for graduation. This course is required as part of the College’s First Year Program and as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum. A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course.

PSY 101 Introduction to General Psychology (4 SH). This course presents principles of human and animal behavior.  As well as the study of individual, group and institutional behavior in context. The course is offered every semester. This course meets the Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST). 

SCI 101 Introduction to Healthcare (1 SH). This course is designed to expose pre-healthcare students to the current state of healthcare delivery as well as the role and responsibilities of healthcare professionals today.  Topics covered in this course include an introduction to health care economics, ethics, workplace skills, team member roles, diversity in healthcare and career projections.

PSY 225 Lifespan Development (4 SH). This course is a chronological approach to the study of lifespan development from infancy to old age. This course meets the developmental psychology requirement for nursing majors. This course will explore both age-related and individual change in physical, cognitive, emotional and social development across the lifespan. New research exploring how our genetics as well as our biological, social, and societal environments interact will illuminate our investigation of this area. This course is required as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum. A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course. 

PHI 240 Biomedical Ethics (4 SH). This course deals with fundamental moral issues that surface in regard to the medical community and to practices therein, beginning with an examination of the theoretical foundation for making moral choices. Initial focus will be on the divergent religious and philosophical positions that have been put forward to justify medical moral choices. Included will be an examination of both consequentialist and non-consequentialist positions, including Divine Command Theory, Utilitarianism, Kant’s categorical position, Buddhist compassion, and others. Once students are grounded in these differing theoretical perspectives, we will examine specific issues from alternative perspectives, giving students an opportunity to compare and contrast divergent positions. This course is required as a College-level course which is part of the UPMC Schools of Nursing Curriculum.  A Pre-nursing or Nursing student must earn a minimum grade of C (2.0/Satisfactory) in this course. This course meets the Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP). 

N101 Professional Concepts of Nursing. This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse. The concepts of communication, clinical decision making, professionalism and patient education are explored. In addition, the holistic aspects of patient care such as culture, spirituality, legal and ethical issues will be discussed. Tanner’s clinical judgment model will provide the framework for the student’s development of clinical judgment and decision making.Pre-requisites: none(3 credits)

N102 Foundational Concepts of Nursing. This course introduces the student to the foundational concepts of nursing practice across the lifespan. Basic care and comfort is explored through the concepts of nutrition, elimination, safety, mobility and sensory perception. Physical assessment is a major component of this course. The promotion of health and wellness is an underlying theme carried throughout the course. The student is introduced to basic foundational skills of nursing practice, including medication administration, through both the clinical and lab settings. Students engage in clinical experiences in inpatient medical-surgical units.  Pre-requisites: none.  (9 credits)

N201 Physiological Concepts of Nursing.  This course introduces the student to the physiological concepts of nursing practice across the lifespan. The fundamental aspects of oxygenation, perfusion, acid-based balance, fluid and electrolytes infection, immunity, inflammation, digestion and metabolism are explored. Through the integration of the nursing concepts, along with Tanner’s clinical judgment model, the student begins to respond to identified patient problems in the clinical setting. Students engage in clinical experiences in acute medical-surgical units.  Pre-requisites: N101, N102 and BIO 135.  (10 credits)

N301 Complex Individual and Family Nursing Concepts. This course introduces the student to complex individual and family concepts of nursing practice. The course explores dynamic concepts across the lifespan. Family dynamics, reproduction and growth and development alterations are a major focus of the course. Concepts of mental health nursing are explored as they relate to the individual and the overall impact on the family. Through the integration of nursing concepts, along with Tanner’s clinical judgment model, the student focuses on assisting the individual and family to adjust to health alterations across the lifespan. Students engage in various clinical experiences in the areas of pediatric, obstetric, geriatric and behavioral health.  Pre-requisites: N10, N102, N201, BIO 135, BIO 136 and PSY 225.  (11 credits)

N 320 Advanced Nursing Concepts. This course introduces the student to advanced concepts of nursing practice. The course builds and expands on the concepts of oxygenation, perfusion, metabolism and infection that were previously introduced in Nursing 211. In addition, the advanced concepts of cellular regulation, intracranial regulation and alterations in tissue integrity are explored. Through the integration of nursing concepts, along with Tanner’s clinical judgment model, the student engages in advanced clinical decision making in high acuity environments. Students engage in various clinical experiences that take place in stepdown units, critical care units and emergency departments.  Pre-requisites: N101, N102, N201, N301, BIO 135, BIO 136, BIO 137, PSY 225 and WRI 111. (7.5 credits)

N340 Transition into Nursing Practice.  This course serves as the student’s transition into the role of professional nursing practice. Leadership and management concepts are applied with an emphasis on safety and quality nursing care. Clinical is conducted through a preceptor experience where the student is given the opportunity to manage, delegate and prioritize care for multiple patients.  Pre-requisites: N101, N102, N201, N301, N320, BIO 135, BIO 136, BIO 137, PSY 225 and WRI 111.  (5.5 credits)

N360 NCLEX Preparation Course.  This course provides the students with NCLEX preparation through content reviews and test taking strategies.  Pre-requisites: N101, N102, N201, N301, N320, BIO 135, BIO 136, BIO 137, PSY 225 and WRI 111.  (2 credits)

NUR 401 Community and Public Health Nursing (4 SH). This course covers contemporary evidence-based practices of nursing care for the improvement of individual, family, community, and global health.  The Registered Nurse will use critical thinking strategies to explore complex nursing situations outside of an institutional setting.  The course will expand the student’s knowledge of determinants of health, primary health care, public health nursing roles and activities, and health care settings within a community.  Topics covered include ethics, trans-cultural care, epidemiology, environmental health, public health, and disaster preparedness.

NUR 402 Nursing Research for Evidence-Based Practice (4 SH). This course is an introduction to the concepts of research in nursing and the use of evidence-based practices in a clinical setting.  Topics covered include identifying a clinical practice problem or issue, appraising research, developing a research question, exploring research methodologies and completing a literature review.

 MTH 135 Concepts of Statistics (4 SH). This course is an introduction to the concepts of statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical summaries of data, confidence intervals and significance tests about hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding and interpretation of data and statistics. This course meets the Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR). 

SOC 327 Medical Sociology (4 SH). This course is a required CLUSTER with NUR 401.  A study of the social aspects of illness and wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles of participants in the health care system, as well as the development of the system itself.  This course meets the Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

NUR 403 Advanced Health Assessment (4 SH). This course builds upon basic physical assessment skills acquired in a pre-licensure program to provide a progressive, modern approach to comprehensively assessing patient’s health status.  The Nursing Process, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) and Patricia Benner’s “Novice to Expert” research provide a framework for development of critical thinking in practice.  Topics covered in this course include the health history, general and regional examination by body systems, and application of advanced assessment skills to the care of pregnant women, infants, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. This course includes clinical hours.

 NUR 404 Nursing Care of Vulnerable and Diverse Populations (4 SH). In 2016, ensuring quality of care and safety for vulnerable populations was identified as a top performance challenge by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This course integrates the AACN Cultural Competence in Baccalaureate Education and applies the framework to the care of vulnerable, marginalized and diverse populations.  Using community survey techniques and skills gained in the NUR 401 course, the Registered Nurse will identify vulnerable and diverse populations in need of healthcare at a community, national or global level. Unfolding case studies provided by the National League of Nursing’s Center for Excellence in the Care of Vulnerable Populationsadds critical thinking, problem solving and realism to the course. Topics covered include identification of the needs of vulnerable and diverse populations, skill development, advocacy, healthcare literacy education, and communication.

NUR 305 Nursing Leadership Seminar (4 SH).  This course presents advanced leadership in nursing practice topics such as current workforce issues, effective use of nursing informatics, leadership development, legal/ethical challenges, professional identity, healthcare policy, and Quality Improvement (QI) practices.  Students are guided through current leadership challenges and opportunities in preparation for leadership roles in various healthcare settings.

NUR 406 Nursing Capstone (3 SH).  This course is primarily taught within a community or acute care setting that the student has identified as a practice area of interest. The student will learn alongside the practicing Registered Nurse to explore how the research problem identified in NUR 402 is affecting that given setting.  The student will participate in clinical hours, collaborate with nursing staff and conduct independent research with the goal of identifying evidence-based strategies and interventions to improve patient outcomes.  This course includes clinical hours.

 

 

What can you do with a Nursing degree?

Imagine yourself as a Registered Nurse (RN).  RN’s with a BSN degree have numerous options in nursing to choose from including medical-surgical nursing, intensive care, trauma nursing, pediatrics, obstetrics, oncology, home health care and community-health nursing.  In addition, many RN’s continue their education to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) or a Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) degree.  Registered Nurses can also earn professional certifications to become nurse anesthetists (CRNA), nurse practitioners (CRNP) and nurse educators (CNE).  The profession of nursing IS more rewarding than you can imagine.