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Child and Family Studies

Course Descriptions

CJS 102 Deviance (ST) (4.00 SH). An exploration of norm-breaking behavior and its consequences. Traditional and contemporary theories of deviance will be examined, as will particular areas of deviant behavior. The change in definitions of what is regarded as deviant will be dealt with at length. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

CJS 201 Juvenile Delinquency & Justice (ST) (4.00 SH). An exploration of juvenile misconduct and its legal consequences. Theories explaining juvenile delinquency from a variety of perspectives will be examined. The emergence and present state of the juvenile justice system will be covered as well. Offered Spring Semester. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

CJS 203 Victimology (2.00 SH). This course provides an introduction to the study of criminal victimization. We will investigate patterns of criminal victimization using empirical data, apply theoretical concepts to empirical patterns, analyze specific forms of victimization (e.g. intimate partner violence, child maltreatment, property victimization), consider the impact of crime on victims and society (e.g. fear of crime), the role of victims within the criminal justice system, specific remedies, and victim rights and services.

CJS 206 Corrections (2.00 SH). This course explores the history, development, current practices and future of correctional systems at the local, state, federal and, at times, global level. This course takes a multi-disciplinary view of selected areas and issues relevant to correctional goals (general/specific deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation, restitution, retribution and restorative justice) for offenders in secure confinement (jails and prisons) and community-based alternatives to jails and prisons (probation, parole, restitution, community service, intensive probation/parole, electronic monitoring, boot camps and community-corrections programs).

ECE 201 Issues & Trends (3.00 SH). This course will focus on the current trends and practices of early childhood education programs which serve children from birth to age nine. Professional development, history and theories, programming, development and learning, and the special needs of young children will be addressed as they relate to early childhood education.

ECE 203 Family-School-Community Diversity (3.00 SH). The focus of this course in on understanding how families and communities are significant contexts for children’s development and school success. Based upon these insights, students will collaboratively explore ways to build bridges of understanding between diverse schools, families, and communities. Student engagement with diverse families at a Family Reading Night as well as in field experiences will allow the student to critically reflect on a family’s funds of knowledge in light of different cultural ways of knowing. The students will use these discoveries to develop culturally responsive explorations for their future classrooms.

EDU 231 Educational Psychology (4.00 SH). A study of the teaching and learning process for students preparing to teach children and adolescents. The units of the course include learning, instruction, human development, motivation, management, assessment and the learner. A practicum with children and/or adolescents is included. This course is offered by the Department of Education and does not count toward a psychology major, minor or as a course within the discipline.

EDU 231C C:Educational Psychology (4.00 SH).

EDU 450 Teaching Areas of High Need (2.00 SH).

EDU 450S Teaching Areas of High Need (2.00 SH).

EDU 610 Advanced Topics (4.00 SH).

ELL 206 English Language Learner (3.00 SH). The course is designed to infuse the teachers competencies related to meeting the instructional needs of English language learners. The course will explore the language, culture, standards-based instruction, assessment, and professionalism in order to understand and teach linguistically diverse learners effectively. Certification students PreK-12 are required to take this course.

PSY 101 Intro To Psychology (ST) (4.00 SH). Principles of human and animal behavior. The study of individual, group and institutional behavior in context. Offered every semester. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PSY 212 Personality (ST) (4.00 SH). A critical survey of the major theories of personality structure, dynamics, and development. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PSY 213 Psychology of Prejudice (ST) (4.00 SH). This class will apply social psychological theory and research to understand the psychological underpinnings of prejudice. Students will explore the impact of prejudice on members of targeted groups with a particular emphasis on understanding the experience of racism. Grounded in psychological theory and research, students will explore current social issues related to prejudice as well as specific ways to reduce stereotyping and prejudice on both a personal and societal level. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PSY 219 Early Child Development (ST) (4.00 SH). A chronological approach to the principles and theories of child development from birth-11 years of age. This course fulfills the developmental psychology requirement for early childhood education majors.

PSY 221 Childhood & Adolescence (4.00 SH). A topical approach to principles of human growth and development, with an emphasis on both childhood and adolescence. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PSY 241 Organizational Psychology (4.00 SH). A study of the interaction of individual and structural characteristics which influence productivity and human dignity in all organizational settings. Primarily utilizing case-study methods.

PSY 281 Principles of Learning (4.00 SH). Analysis of the variety of mechanisms by which our behavior and our representations develop from experience. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 291 Adult & Aging (4.00 SH). An examination of the theories and research regarding development and change from young adulthood through old age.

PSY 431 Developmental Psychopathology (4.00 SH). An overview of problems and processes that lead to abnormal development in childhood and adolescence. Included is an in-depth examination of early psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or 221.

SED 201 Foundations Special Education (ST) (4.00 SH). This course is designed as an introduction to the field of special education for students seeking careers in education. It includes such topics as: identification, placement, programming, inclusive practices, advocacy, and other topics relating to persons who have disabilities from historical, medical, educational, societal, and individual points of view. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SED 201C C:Foundations Special Education (4.00 SH).

SED 402 Behavior Management Spec Edu (4.00 SH). This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the characteristics of students with learning and behavior problems with respect to factors that influence the instructional environment while providing classroom management theory and practical applications for students who have special needs.

SED 411 Legal Issues Assessment (2.00 SH). The focus of the course is on the analysis of legislation, litigation, and administrative rulings related to special education. The course will emphasize the development of legally sound policies and procedures to ensure an appropriate education for students with disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to use to effectively instruct children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings.

SED 412 Assessment Methods (2.00 SH). The course will emphasize the development and implementation of assessment procedures for students who have disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to administer to effectively evaluate children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings.

SED 413 High Incidence Strategies (2.00 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have high incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy.

SED 414 Low Incidence Strategies (2.00 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have low incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy.

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology (ST) (4.00 SH). In taking this course, students will become more aware of the effects of social forces on the individual. The course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods used in the systematic study of society. Topics include: social norms, social groups, social conflict, social inequality, social institutions, social change, and the sociological perspective. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 106 Individual & Society (ST) (4.00 SH). Analysis of the interrelationship between society, culture, and the individual with emphasis upon the emergence of self and the participation of the individual in social processes. Attention is paid to comparative theories of action and empirical studies. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 107 Sociology of Gender (ST) (4.00 SH). An examination of the social and historical influences upon behavior as it is differentiated by gender. The pattern of learning sex roles as well as the current redefinition of such roles will be discussed. Material from a variety of sources will be examined with the intent of both documenting and explaining this differentiation of roles. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 108 Social Problems/Policies (ST) (4.00 SH). An examination of societal intentions and actions for resolving issues of public concern such as poverty, unemployment, and the well-being of those who are sick, disabled, displaced, at risk, dependent or racial/ethnic minorities. Both historical and ideological factors will be explored as will be the consequences of action in terms of social programming and policies. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 200 Studies in Sociology (4.00 SH). This course will deal with specific aspects of society not included in the regular curriculum. Topics will be announced prior to registration.

SOC 204 Social Work (4.00 SH). An exploration of the knowledge base, theories, and methods that social workers use. Several of the major fields of practice are examined including family and child welfare, health care, mental health, criminal justice, and gerontology.

SOC 209 Minority/Majority (ST) (4.00 SH). This course will trace the history of race as a concept, examine how racial and ethnic relations changed over time in the U.S., analyze the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination, and consider how majority-minority relations shape life chances for various groups in the U.S. and throughout the world. Some of the topics we cover include: ethnic identity, popular culture, segregation, immigration, racial profiling, and interracial relationships. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 210 Gerontology (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the different social, biological, and demographic aspects of aging. Population characteristics of people over 65 as well as patterns of age-graded expectations will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the changing roles of the elderly in our society as well as attitudes toward aging. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

SOC 214 Social Class in America (ST) (4.00 SH). An examination of the various forms and systems of social inequality in human societies, with attention to the mechanisms that perpetuate inequalities, ideologies that legitimate them, and possibilities for social mobility. Particular focus is on social class inequality in the contemporary United States and the social problems of poverty and homelessness. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 241 Sociol Violence NonViolence (4.00 SH). Violence, from a sociological perspec-tive, is considered a social phenomenon that evolves in a socio-historical-political moment. This course will evaluate theory and research on violence and nonviolence from both a macro and micro sociological lens. Topics investigated will be interpersonal violence, violence against animals, hate crimes, school violence, bullying, terrorism, structural violence, and social move-ments that involve both violence and nonviolence. We will also investigate how race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, age, and ability shapes who is more likely to be a victim or perpetrator of violence.

SOC 260 Food, Culture and Society (ST) (4.00 SH).

SOC 306 Gender & Family (4.00 SH). This course examines the function, structure, and variety of families. Topics include: the historical origins of contemporary American family life; patterns in family formation and dissolution, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, and divorce; sexuality and families; work-family (im)balance; and social problems, such as poverty and intimate violence. We will discuss and debate the implications of changing family life in the United States and abroad. Prerequisite: One lower-level sociology or criminal justice studies course or permission of instructor.

SOC 327 Medical Sociology (4.00 SH). A study of the social aspects of illness and wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles of participants in the health care system, as well as the development of the system itself. Prerequisite: One lower-level sociology or criminal justice studies course or permission of instructor.

SOC 350 Social Theory (4.00 SH). A survey of dominant traditions in classical and contemporary social theory, as derived from their social context. This course is a preparation for more specialized study in sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and one additional sociology or criminal justice studies course. Offered Fall Semester.

 

What can you do with a Child and Family Studies degree?

Imagine yourself a private, parochial school, or charter school teacher, a preschool teacher, a therapeutic support staff worker, a family support staff worker, a child care center teacher, an early intervention specialist, a family caseworker, or a career counselor.