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Child and Family Studies

Course Descriptions

ECE 201 Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education (4 SH). This course will focus on the current trends and practices of early childhood education programs which serve children from birth to age nine. Professional development, history and theories, programming, development and learning, and the special needs of young children will be addressed as they relate to early childhood education. D. Reed.

ECE 203 Diversity within Family-School-Community Partnerships (3 SH). The focus of this course in on understanding how families and communities are significant contexts for children’s development and school success. Based upon these insights, students will collaboratively explore ways to build bridges of understanding between diverse schools, families, and communities. Student engagement with diverse families at a Family Reading Night as well as in field experiences will allow the student to critically reflect on a family’s funds of knowledge in light of different cultural ways of knowing. The students will use these discoveries to develop culturally responsive explorations for their future classrooms. D. Reed.

EDU 231 Educational Psychology (4 SH). A study of the teaching and learning process for students preparing to teach children and adolescents. The units of the course include learning, instruction, human development, motivation, management, assessment and the learner. A practicum with children and/or adolescents is included. This course is offered by the Department of Education and does not count toward a psychology major, minor or as a course within the discipline. D. Huey, T. Keller.

ELL 206 English Language Learners (3 SH). The course is designed to infuse the teachers competencies related to meeting the instructional needs of English language learners. The course will explore the language, culture, standards-based instruction, assessment, and professionalism in order to understand and teach linguistically diverse learners effectively. Certification students PreK-12 are required to take this course. T. Keller.

SED 201 Foundations of Special Education (4 SH). This course is designed as an introduction to the field of special education for students seeking careers in education. It includes such topics as: identification, placement, programming, inclusive practices, advocacy, and other topics relating to persons who have disabilities from historical, medical, educational, societal, and individual points of view. A. DuBois.

SED 402 Behavior Management in Special Education (4 SH). This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the characteristics of students with learning and behavior problems with respect to factors that influence the instructional environment while providing classroom management theory and practical applications for students who have special needs. A. Camardese.

SED 411 Legal Issues and Assessment in Special Education (2 SH). The focus of the course is on the analysis of legislation, litigation, and administrative rulings related to special education. The course will emphasize the development of legally sound policies and procedures to ensure an appropriate education for students with disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to use to effectively instruct children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings. A. DuBois.

SED 412 Assessment Methods in Special Education (2 SH). The course will emphasize the development and implementation of assessment procedures for students who have disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to administer to effectively evaluate children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings. A. DuBois.

SED 413 High Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education (2 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have high incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy. S. Lynch.

SED 414 Low Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education (2 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have low incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy. S. Lynch.

EDU 450 - Teaching in Areas of High Need (2 SH). This course will address the racial, cultural, and economic needs of school districts trying to narrow the achievement gap. During the semester, students will be analyzing the historical, socioeconomic, and political factors school districts in areas of high need confront. Specifically, students will ferret out effective instructional and organizational practices, examine home-school connections, and discover disparities in available resources for urban and rural schools. Students will participate in an in-depth practicum in a school of high need under the mentorship of qualified educators.

PSY 101 Introduction to General Psychology (4 SH). Principles of human and animal behavior. The study of individual, group and institutional behavior in context. Offered every semester. Staff.

PSY 219 Early Childhood Development (4 SH). A chronological approach to the principles and theories of child development from birth-11 years of age. This course fulfills the developmental psychology requirement for early childhood education majors. M. Medvin.

PSY 221 Childhood and Adolescence (4 SH). A topical approach to principles of human growth and development, wit an emphasis on both childhood and adolescence. M. Medvin.

PSY 281 Principles of Learning and Memory (4 SH). Analysis of the variety of mechanisms by which our behavior and our representations develop from experience. Prerequisite: PSY 101. D. Buffalari.

PSY 431 Developmental Psychopathology (4 SH). An overview of problems and processes that lead to abnormal development in childhood and adolescence. Included is an in-depth examination of early psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or 221. M. Medvin.

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology (4 SH). In taking this course, students will become more aware of the effects of social forces on the individual. The course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods used in the systematic study of society. Topics include: social norms, social groups, social conflict, social inequality, social institutions, social change, and the sociological perspective. Staff.

SOC 107 Sociology of Gender (4 SH). An examination of the social and historical influences upon behavior as it is differentiated by gender. The pattern of learning sex roles as well as the current redefinition of such roles will be discussed. Material from a variety of sources will be examined with the intent of both documenting and explaining this differentiation of roles. K. Robison.

SOC 108 Social Problems, Social Policies (4 SH). An examination of societal intentions and actions for resolving issues of public concern such as poverty, unemployment, and the well-being of those who are sick, disabled, displaced, at risk, dependent or racial/ethnic minorities. Both historical and ideological factors will be explored as will be the consequences of action in terms of social programming and policies.

SOC 204 Introduction to Social Work (4 SH). An exploration of the knowledge base, theories, and methods that social workers use. Several of the major fields of practice are examined including family and child welfare, health care, mental health, criminal justice, and gerontology.

SOC 209 Minority-Majority Relations (4 SH). This course will trace the history of race as a concept, examine how racial and ethnic relations changed over time in the U.S., analyze the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination, and consider how majority-minority relations shape life chances for various groups in the U.S. and throughout the world. Some of the topics we cover include: ethnic identity, popular culture, segregation, immigration, racial profiling, and interracial relationships.

SOC 214 Social Class in America (4 SH). An examination of the various forms and systems of social inequality in human societies, with attention to the mechanisms that perpetuate inequalities, ideologies that legitimate them, and possibilities for social mobility. Particular focus is on social class inequality in the contemporary United States and the social problems of poverty and homelessness. K. Park.

SOC 306 Sociology of Family (4 SH). This course examines the function, structure, and variety of families. Topics include: the historical origins of contemporary American family life; patterns in family formation and dissolution, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, and divorce; sexuality and families; work-family (im)balance; and social problems, such as poverty and intimate violence. We will discuss and debate the implications of changing family life in the United States and abroad. Prerequisite: One lower-level sociology or criminal justice studies course or permission of instructor.

CJS 201 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice (4 SH). An exploration of juvenile misconduct and its legal consequences. Theories explaining juvenile delinquency from a variety of perspectives will be examined. The emergence and present state of the juvenile justice system will be covered as well. Offered Spring Semester. K. Robison.

 

What can you do with a Child and Family Studies degree?

Imagine yourself a private, parochial school, or charter school teacher, a preschool teacher, a therapeutic support staff worker, a family support staff worker, a child care center teacher, an early intervention specialist, a family caseworker, or a career counselor.