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Theatre

Course Descriptions

Theatre Courses


THE 101 Intro To Theatre (VP) (4.00 SH). An examination of the process by which dramatic literature becomes theatre. The course examines the forms of comedy, tragedy, and their offshoots as well as the elements of theatre—structure, character, language, scenography—and the styles of theatre with an emphasis on modernism and post-modernism. This course does not meet major requirements. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

THE 102 Intro to Acting (VP) (4.00 SH). Concentrates on approaches to acting and analysis of scenes from an actor’s point of view. The laboratory section concentrates on scene work, monologue exercises, and improvisation. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

THE 111 Stagecraft I (VP) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the fundamentals of technical theatre, THE 111 provides the student with the knowledge of modern stagecraft and the theater plant and with practical experience in handling tools and materials essential to constructing, painting, assembling, dressing, and shifting stage scenery. Students will construct the scenery for departmental productions. Lab and participating as part of the crew for the current main stage productions required. Meets Visual and Performing Arts Intellectual Perspective requirement (VP).

THE 211 American Dramatists (HC) (4.00 SH). This entry-level course introduces students to significant, often groundbreaking dramas by the most acclaimed American playwrights of the 20th century: Eugene O’Neill, Philip Barry, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, John Guare, Sam Shepard, David Mamet, August Wilson, Tony Kushner, and Suzan Lori-Parks, among others. Students will explore varying use of dramatic content and structure across time and through major American themes, as well as the ever-changing understanding of theatrical convention and innovation. (Also listed as ENG 108.) Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

THE 212 Shakespeare's Plays (HC) (4.00 SH). An introductory course in the drama and stagecraft of the undisputed Titan of English literature, William Shakespeare. Students will analyze and discuss Shakespeare’s achievement in poetic and theatrical presentations of popular stories for the Elizabethan stage. The syllabus will draw from five to six plays, ranging from comedy to history play to tragedy to romance, and lessons may incorporate screenings of notable films, stage, and TV productions, in their entirety or choice selections. (Also listed as ENG 113 Shakespeare.) Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

THE 213 African American Drama (HC) (4.00 SH). This class will explore African-American culture from the days of slavery through the present, examining African-American playwrights’ characters and personal lives, and by exploring the historical climate at the time the texts were written. (Also listed as ENG 124.) Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

THE 214 British & Irish Drama (4.00 SH). An introductory survey of the seminal dramatic literature constituting the British theatrical tradition, from the English Renaissance (Shakespeare and his cohort), through Restoration, Enlightenment and Victorian traditions, to contemporary political and avant-garde drama. The course syllabus will share space with representative 19th- and 20th-century Irish plays by major dramatists such as Wilde, Shaw, Synge, Yeats, Beckett, Friel, McDonagh, and Walsh. Students will acquaint themselves with a range of plays, playwrights, performance spaces, dramaturgical conventions, and acting methods of these periods to understand the role and impact of theater in British and Irish popular culture. When possible, the class will attend a stage production of such plays. (Also listed as ENG 127).

THE 215 Soldiers on Stage: MilitEnt (ST) (4.00 SH). Over the semester, students will be introduced a variety of entertainments provided for the American military since the early 20th century. While discovering different live performances for troops offered by civilians or soldiers as well as analyzing dramatic scripts that feature soldier and/or veteran characters, students will also be re-viewing Americana's history at both times of war and peace. Videos, audio clips, archival materials, guest lecturers, and independent research projects will be supplemented by service-learning projects coordinated with nearby active U.S. military bases and/or veteran organizations.

THE 225 Theatre/Soc Engagement (ST) (4.00 SH). In this highly participatory course, students will engage the social issues of the day using various interactive performance methods, including Playback Theatre and Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed techniques. The course culminates in the creation of an original devised production that addresses a local social issue and is produced in collaboration with an under-represented segment of the local community. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

THE 255 Playwriting (4.00 SH). The playwriting course will look at the challenges of writing play scripts by studying and writing scripts. After exploring language as action, building characters, non-verbal communication through writing scenes, we will work at structuring and writing one-act and two-act plays. (Also listed as WRI 255.)

THE 301 Theatre Practicum (1.00 SH). Major assignments in departmental productions: acting, directing, stage managing, lighting, sound.

THE 321 Principles of Theatrical Design (4.00 SH). This is an introductory course to performance design. The material covered will be primarily hands-on projects designed to provide students the chance for self-expression as it relates to stage design. Skills to be covered will be sketching and drawing, painting, drafting, and model building. Prerequisite: THE 111.

THE 370 Theatre History I (HC) (4.00 SH). History of theatre and its relationship to the arts and sciences: Greek, Medieval, Renaissance and the Age of Reason. Major emphasis of study focuses on the correlation between the physical stage, the theatrical conventions, and the playscripts of the period. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

THE 371 Theatre History II:18th-Present(HC) (4.00 SH). History of theatre and its relationship to the arts and sciences: Romantic Period and the Modern/Post-Modern World. Major emphasis of study focuses on the correlation between the physical stage, the theatrical conventions, and the playscripts of the period.

THE 410 Advanced Topics (4.00 SH). Advanced Topics

 

Supporting Courses


ENG 108 American Playwrights (HC) (4.00 SH). This entry-level course introduces students to significant, often groundbreaking dramas by the most acclaimed American playwrights of the twentieth century: Eugene O’Neill, Philip Barry, Lillian Hellman, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, John Guare, Sam Shepard, David Mamet, August Wilson, Paula Vogel, Tony Kushner and Lynn Nottage among others.

ENG 113 Introduction to Shakespeare (HC) (4.00 SH). An introductory course, designed primarily for non-English majors, in the drama and stagecraft of the undisputed Titan of English Literature, William Shakespeare. Students will analyze and discuss Shakespeare’s achievement in poetic and theatrical presentations of popular stories for the Elizabethan stage. The syllabus will draw from five to six plays, ranging from comedy to history play to tragedy to romance, and lessons will incorporate screenings of notable film, stage, and TV productions, in their entirety or choice selections.

ENG 124 African American Drama (HC) (4.00 SH). This class explores African-American culture, from the days of slavery to the present, through reading, discussing, and analyzing plays written by important African-American playwrights and also by examining the issues those texts and the African-American experience raise. In our discussions and various assignments, what it means to be “Black” in America will be investigated by examining the characters these writers have created, by learning about the playwrights’ lives, and also by exploring the historical climate at the time these texts were created. Cross-listed with FS 324 and THE 213.

ENG 124C C:African American Drama (HC) (4.00 SH). Clustered with HIS-223C - African American History and Drama Clustered with MUS-103C - Major Voices: African-American Jazz & Drama This cluster will explore the way in which African-American artists, particularly dramatists and musicians, have tried to recover and recount the experiences of their ancestors in this country. Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, African-American playwrites and musicians have used their unique talents to strip away the myths of inferiority that have traditionally surrounded their race in the U.S. In doing so, these artists have exposed a thriving culture which will be the focus of this cluster.

ENG 127 British and Irish (HC) (4.00 SH). A fascinating introduction into great theater plays for the British and Irish stage of the last 150 years, from the era of Victorian melodrama to the radical, sexy, and provocative drama of today. We shall acquaint ourselves with the landmark playwrights who have influenced the way we dramatize stories on stage, in film, and on television. They include Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, J. M. Synge, Noel Coward, John Osborne, Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Caryl Churchill, Joe Orton, Marina Carr, Enda Walsh, and Martin McDonagh. Class meetings will include video selections of productions and suggested film versions to sample.

WRI 355 Playwriting Workshop (4.00 SH). A beginning workshop in which students develop skills in reading, evaluating, writing and revising theater plays. (Also listed as THE 255.)

 

What can you do with a Theatre degree?

Imagine yourself a playwright, actor, public relations professional, business leader, event planner, or designer.