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Film Studies

Course Descriptions

Film Studies Courses


FS 101 Introduction to Film Studies (HC) (4.00 SH). This course focuses on the major language systems of film: photography, mise en scene, movement, editing, sound, acting, sets and costumes, writing and narrative structure, and ideology. Emphasis is on how formalist and realist filmmakers use these language systems to create meaning. Through lecture, reading, discussion, and screening of films, the students will become informed, sophisticated, active observers of cinema. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

FS 102 History of Film (HC) (4.00 SH). This course is designed for students to develop a greater comprehension of the historical evolution of cinematic art. Though the course focuses primarily on cinema in the United States, some important and representative films from other countries will be studied. In addition, emphasis will be given to films that represent the development of film as an industry and how this corresponds to (and conflicts with) artistic endeavor. Students will write analyses of both films they watch for the course and films they choose to watch on their own. In keeping with the goals of the course, these analyses will require the students to fit the films into the context of cinema as a greater whole and to demonstrate an understanding of film as both art and industry. In addition, mid-term and final exams will require students to analyze certain films and their contributions to the development of cinema. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

FS 105 Alfred Hitchock (4.00 SH).

FS 124 African American Drama & Film (HC) (4.00 SH).

FS 134 Shake,Rattle & Roll:Natr Disas (HC) (4.00 SH).

FS 141 The Journalist in Film (4.00 SH).

FS 142 Genres: General (HC) (4.00 SH).

FS 142A Genres:The Musical (4.00 SH).

FS 142B Genres: Crime (4.00 SH).

FS 142E Genres:Romantic Comedy (4.00 SH).

FS 142M Genres: Marvel (4.00 SH).

FS 142N Genres:Native American Lit/Flm (HC) (4.00 SH).

FS 404 Film Criticism (4.00 SH). This course teaches the basic concepts and critical approaches of film analysis. Some of these analytical methods include humanism, auteurism, genre studies, social science criticism, cultural criticism, semiology, structuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism, and feminism. Looking at the films through a critical lens while incorporating an analysis of its basic language systems offers students a better understanding of what filmmakers are saying as well as how they are saying it.

FS 500 Global Cinema (4.00 SH). This course points its lens at important moviemaking beyond Hollywood studio productions and American indie films. Students will familiarize themselves with distinguisdhed international films, actors, and directors, strive to understand them in thier cultural contexts, and recognize their cinematic influence on filmmaking around the world. Work will include short response papers, quizzes, and a research paper. (No prerequisites).

 

Supporting Courses


ENG 158 Reading the Film Text (HC) (4.00 SH). ENG 101-199 Studies in English, American, world or comparative literature, or in specific literary genres and themes. Individual sections experiment with different approaches and topics. The times and a brief description of each course is provided each semester. These courses are designed primarily for non-English majors. More than one ENG 101–199 may be taken for credit, as long as each course is different. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

ENG 159 History of the Film Text (HC) (4.00 SH). ENG 101-199 Studies in English, American, world or comparative literature, or in specific literary genres and themes. Individual sections experiment with different approaches and topics. The times and a brief description of each course is provided each semester. These courses are designed primarily for non-English majors. More than one ENG 101–199 may be taken for credit, as long as each course is different. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

 

What can you do with a Film Studies degree?

Imagine yourself a writer, editor, film executive, educator, a journalist, publicist, or film executive.