FYI: A cucumber is not a vegetable but a fruit. So is a pumpkin and squash.

Measuring time


In class we’re discovering (or will discover gradually) that the concept of time is quite significant to human beings, for example in Gen 1.1–2.4a. In class we also learned that people of different times and places measured, and still measure time differently. People in the “far east” generally prefer the lunar calendar over the solar calendar in many ways (festivals, holidays, etc.)


In your syllabus (Bible courses) see under “Recommended books.” There you will notice that the Jewish Publication Society published the Tanakh in AD 1985, which is, according to the Jewish calendar, year 5748. The Jewish year begins in the fall with Rosh Hashanah (= head/beginning of the year). The lunar year generally begins about a month or two after the solar new year. Confusing, yes? Well, below are some alternative ways people figure out what year it is.

To see what year it is according to the Jewish calendar, add 3760 to the Gregorian year. For example, Anno Domini (= year of the Lord) 2000 is Anno Mundi (= year of the world) 5760.

To see what year it is according to the Korean calendar, add 2333 to the Gregorian year. For example, Anno Domini 2000 is Korean year 4333.

To see what year it is according to the Tibetan calendar, add 127 to the Gregorian year. For example, Anno Domini 2000 is Tibetan year 2127.