Chicago Manual of Style (for Na classes)

 

The following examples are based on those on the official CMS site, which you should visit for more examples. See also here and here.

 

For most categories, the first is an example of a footnote or endnote, and the second an example of a bibliography entry.

 

(N.b. punctuation marks and the space after them.)

 

 

 

Footnote (or endnote)

 

Bibliography

Book with one author

 

1. Wendy Doniger, Splitting the Difference (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999), 13.

 

After the first reference:

8. Doniger, 11.

 

or if you cite other works by Doniger in the same paper:

13. Doniger, Splitting the Difference, 12.

16. Doniger, The Hindus: An Alternative History, 689.

 

 

Doniger, Wendy. Splitting the Difference. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Book with two authors

 

3. Guy Cowlishaw and Robin Dunbar, Primate Conservation Biology (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000), 13.

 

 

Cowlishaw, Guy, and Robin Dunbar. Primate Conservation Biology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Book with more than two authors

 

6. Edward O. Laumann et al., The Social Organization of Sexuality: Sexual Practices in the United States (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), 13.

 

 

Laumann, Edward O., John H. Gagnon, Robert T. Michael, and Stuart Michaels. The Social Organization of Sexuality: Sexual Practices in the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994.

Editor, translator, or compiler

 

 

7. Richmond Lattimore, trans., The Iliad of Homer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), 13.

 

Lattimore, Richmond, trans. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951.

Chapter or other part of a book

 

9. W. Freeman Twaddell, “A Note on Old High German Umlaut,” in Readings in Linguistics I: The Development of Descriptive Linguistics in America, 1925–1956, 4th ed., ed. Martin Joos (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1957), 13.

 

 

Twaddell, W. Freeman. “A Note on Old High German Umlaut.” In Readings in Linguistics I: The Development of Descriptive Linguistics in America, 1925–1956. 4th ed. Edited by Martin Joos. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1957.

Chapter of an edited volume originally published elsewhere (common for primary sources)

 

10. Quintus Tullius Cicero. “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship,” in Rome: Late Republic and Principate, ed. Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White, vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, ed. John Boyer and Julius Kirshner (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), 13.

 

Cicero, Quintus Tullius. “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship.” In Rome: Late Republic and Principate, edited by Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White. Vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, edited by John Boyer and Julius Kirshner. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. Originally published in Evelyn S. Shuckburgh, trans., The Letters of Cicero, vol. 1 (London: George Bell & Sons, 1908).

 

Preface, foreword, introduction, and similar parts of a book

 

 

12. James Rieger, introduction to Frankenstein or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974), 13.

 

Rieger, James. Introduction to Frankenstein or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974.

Book published in both printed and electronic forms

 

13. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders’ Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), 115.

 

N.B.: be sure that it is clear which form was consulted; however, there is no need to indicate “paper” in a citation to a traditional bound book.

 

 

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders’ Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. Also available online at http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/ and as a CD-ROM.

Journal article

 

16. John Maynard Smith, “The Origin of Altruism,” Nature 393 (1998): 639.

 

 

Smith, John Maynard. “The Origin of Altruism.” Nature 393 (1998): 639–40.

Article in an electronic journal

 

21. Mark A. Hlatky et al., "Quality-of-Life and Depressive Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women after Receiving Hormone Therapy: Results from the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) Trial," Journal of the American Medical Association 287, no. 5 (2002), http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v287n5/rfull/joc10108.html#aainfo.

 

N.B.: an access date, not generally required by Chicago, may be required by your publisher or discipline; if so, include it parenthetically at the end of the citation.

 

 

Hlatky, Mark A., Derek Boothroyd, Eric Vittinghoff, Penny Sharp, and Mary A. Whooley. "Quality-of-Life and Depressive Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women after Receiving Hormone Therapy: Results from the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) Trial." Journal of the American Medical Association 287, no. 5 (February 6, 2002), http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v287n5/rfull/joc10108.html#aainfo.

Popular magazine article

 

24. Steve Martin, “Sports-Interview Shocker,” New Yorker, May 6, 2002, 84.

 

 

Martin, Steve. “Sports-Interview Shocker.” New Yorker, May 6, 2002, 84.

Newspaper article

 

25. William S. Niederkorn, “A Scholar Recants on His ‘Shakespeare’ Discovery,” New York Times, June 20, 2002, Arts section, Midwest edition.

 

Newspaper articles may be cited in running text instead of in a note or an in-text citation, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography or reference list as well:


As William Niederkorn noted in a New York Times article on June 20, 2002, . . .

 

 

Niederkorn, William S. “A Scholar Recants on His ‘Shakespeare’ Discovery.” New York Times, June 20, 2002, Arts section, Midwest edition.

Book review

 

33. James Gorman, “Endangered Species,” review of The Last American Man, by Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times Book Review, June 2, 2002, 16.

 

Gorman, James. “Endangered Species.” Review of The Last American Man, by Elizabeth Gilbert. New York Times Book Review, June 2, 2002, 16.

Theses and dissertations

 

35. M. Amundin, “Click Repetition Rate Patterns in Communicative Sounds from the Harbour Porpoise, Phocoena phocoena” (Ph.D. diss., Stockholm University, 1991), 22–29, 35.

 

 

Amundin, M. “Click Repetition Rate Patterns in Communicative Sounds from the Harbour Porpoise, Phocoena phocoena.” Ph.D. diss., Stockholm University, 1991.

Paper presented at a meeting or conference

 

36. Brian Doyle, “Howling Like Dogs: Metaphorical Language in Psalm 59” (paper presented at the annual international meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, Berlin, Germany, June 19–22, 2002), 15–16.

 

 

Doyle, Brian. “Howling Like Dogs: Metaphorical Language in Psalm 59.” Paper presented at the annual international meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, Berlin, Germany, June 19–22, 2002.

Personal communications

 

In an e-mail message to the author on October 31, 2002, John Doe revealed that . . .

 

Or the reference may be given in a note:

 

39. John Doe, e-mail message to author, October 31, 2002.

 

 


References to Bible passages should be included in the body of the text, usually inside parentheses (e.g., Job 1.3). See examples in academic books or articles written by biblical scholars, e.g., critical commentaries.