Philosophy Requirements

And Courses

 

Requirements

Philosophy, a critical and reflective discipline, fosters transferable skills applicable to most careers, fields of study, and personal endeavors. Philosophy may be teamed with virtually any other major in order to add depth and breadth to another discipline. Historically the most fundamental of the liberal arts, philosophy develops perspective, critical and creative thinking, rational standards of discourse, and sensitivity to value issues. Philosophy develops the individual's sense of meaning and encourages the building of a coherent personal world-view.

Requirements for the major in Philosophy:
A major in Philosophy requires a minimum of 40 semester hours in Philosophy courses, including 101 and 102; two courses from 200 - 210; two courses from 212 - 222; one course from 230 - 260; 401; 601; and one philosophy elective. Students majoring in philosophy will be required to take four philosophy courses before taking 401. They must also take 401 before taking 601 (the capstone). Acceptable electives include Religion 259 and 364.

Courses from other disciplines that are recommended to students majoring in Philosophy are Political Science 221 or 323 and at least one course each in Psychology, Sociology, and History. Philosophy majors will also find it helpful to acquire a working knowledge of at least one of the following languages: Latin, Ancient Greek, or German.

Students majoring in Philosophy may choose to double major in almost any discipline from the Humanities, Natural Sciences, or Social Sciences and to enter the honors program. Pre-law, pre-med, and pre-seminary students find the Philosophy major exceptionally useful. The critical thinking skills in which philosophers excel are receiving increasing recognition among today's employers as a valuable asset in the ever more complex business and professional worlds.

Requirements for the minor in Philosophy:
A minor in Philosophy enhances almost any major by adding depth and breadth to a degree only somewhat less than that of the major. The Philosophy minor requires 24 semester hours in philosophy courses. These must include Philosophy 101 and 102, one history of philosophy course (200 - 210); one topics course (212 - 222); one ethics course (230 - 260); and one further philosophy elective. The philosophy adviser will help students select the other courses best suited to each person's interests. Student minoring in philosophy will be required to take one 100 level course before taking a 200 level course, and three philosophy courses before taking a 400 level course.

Scheduling of the major or minor:
Philosophy majors and minors should plan their schedules carefully, since some courses are offered only in alternate years. Ideally, students anticipating a major in Philosophy should complete 101, 102, and 201 by the close of their sophomore year. A long-range course schedule, available from the department, should be discussed with the adviser before first-year courses are scheduled. A double major including Philosophy, or a Philosophy minor combined with another major, can usually be arranged, providing that careful planning occurs early in the student's career.

 

 

Courses

(All courses are four semester hours unless noted.)
Liberal Studies Requirements: PHI 101, 102, 200 - 210, 212 - 222, 230 - 260 satisfy the Religious and Philosophical Thought Intellectual Perspective requirement. The letters "
IP" after a course indicates that the course carries credit for the Religious and Philosophical Thought and Tradition IP.

101 Problems of Philosophy. IP
This course will explore various themes introducing the student to the whole discipline of
philosophy: the history of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the contemporary thinkers and some of the divisions of philosophical thought such as epistemology, ontology, and ethics. Usually offered every semester.

102 Practical Logic. IP
A systematic introduction to critical thinking. This study of the methods and principles for the evaluation of argument includes formal techniques for reasoning that provides conclusive grounds for the truth of its conclusions. Both traditional (Aristotelian) and modern (Boolean) logic are considered, as is informal logic. Offered at least once each year.

200 - 210 The History of Philosophy. IP
Studies of various historical periods of philosophy, such as the Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern, and Contemporary periods and studies of the thought characteristic of particular centuries such as the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The historical context of the period will be considered as relevant to philosophical thought.
Detailed descriptions of individual courses are available before the semester in which each course is offered. Click here to see the course available next semester. More than one PHI 200 - 210 may be taken for credit, as long as each course has a different number, indicating different content. All topics in philosophy courses receive Religious and Philosophical Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective Credit.

212-222 Topics in Philosophy. IP
Philosophical studies of various specific topics, such as philosophy of science, philosophy of art, of religion, of mind and so on. Detailed descriptions of individual courses will be made available before the semester in which that course is offered. More than one PHI 212 - 222 may be taken for credit, as long as each course has a different number, indicating different content. All topics in philosophy courses receive Religious and Philosophical Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective Credit.

230-260 Practical Ethics. IP
Studies in the application of moral philosophy to ethical questions raised by the practical issues of our time. Individual sections will focus on the application of developed moral theories such as virtue ethics, utilitarianism, or an ethics of duty, to specific areas of inquiry.
Detailed descriptions of individual courses are available before the semester in which each course is offered. Click here to see the course available next semester. More than one PHI 230 - 260 may be taken for credit, as long as each course has a different number, indicating different content. All ethics courses receive Religious and Philosophical Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective Credit.

401-410 Advanced Topics in Philosophy.
A thorough investigation of restricted areas of study in philosophy. One philosopher, one area, one idea or term, or one branch of philosophy will be selected and explored in detail. Different areas of content will receive different course numbers and a student may take more than one 400 level course as long as they have different numbers, indicating different content. Offered every Spring.

560, 570, 580, 590 Field Experience/Internship.

601 Philosophy Capstone.
Advanced study of special topics. Required of all senior Philosophy majors. The capstone in philosophy will attempt to prepare majors for the challenges of publication in the field. Under the guidance of their advisor senior students will attempt to produce a polished article on a selected topic, using an appropriate style and format. They will attempt to publish this paper in a suitable journal, such as those specializing in the publication of undergraduate philosophy articles, for example Dialogue, the journal of Phi Sigma Tau, the National Philosophy Honorary Society.

620, 630, 640, 650 Independent Study.
Advanced study under guidance of a staff member in a special area selected by the student. Prerequisites: Three relevant courses in Philosophy and approval of the department chair.

660, 670, 680, 690 Honors Project.