Home

Contact Information

Course Information

Research/ Publications

Personal Information

 

 

Reading 980

Spring 2010
PRACTICUM IN READING
(January 20 – May 12, 2010)
I.  INTENT OF COURSE
 
This practicum experience is designed to offer you an opportunity to enact your evolving literacy beliefs about curriculum, instruction, and assessment with a small group of students, their families, and other teachers.  Based on the theory and practice you have already explored in previous reading courses (Reading 810, 820, 850, 860), now is your chance to put it all together and use this newfound knowledge in a school setting.  We will also consider how you can use these literacy practices in your own classroom. 
A.  GOALS OF COURSES
The purpose of this practicum is to provide you with an opportunity to: 
1)  Become a literacy leader by collaboratively planning and implementing literacy curriculum, instruction, and assessment experiences with teachers in your school community in order to gain a more global perspective,
2)  Use informal and formal methods of literacy assessment with emergent through independent readers in order to build on students' strengths and provide support for areas of growth,
3)  Develop and revise curriculum responsive to students' needs,
4)  Build a learning partnership with students' families and establish a bridge between home and school literacy and assessment experiences, and
5)  Address literacy at all levels from emergent to independent and examine the
causes and characteristics of reading and writing difficulties.
Your personal engagements with 4+ students and their families will allow you to reflect on prior curriculum and assessment experiences and explore purposeful instruction for the classroom.  My intent is to act as a guide, facilitator, and co-learner in your explorations; however the responsibility for what you learn and how much you learn lies with you. 
B.  NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR THE ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS
In relation to literacy standards developed jointly by the National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association (1996), our class will use these guidelines in our work with teachers, students, and parents in our classrooms (see www.ncte.org/standards -see Section VIII). 
C.  PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STANDARDS
In relation to the Pennsylvania Department of Education Standards for Reading Specialists (1/31/01), our class will use these standards to create responsive curriculum and assessment (See PDE Standards listed in Learning Experiences.)

 

II.  READINGS FOR COURSE
All texts from previous REA and literacy courses (810, 820, 830, 850, 860, 890, 990) and your professional library
Articles from journals, websites, and books shared by Dr. Klassen Endrizzi
Books from McGill library, websites, resource materials from your school and colleagues, journal articles you discover
 
III.  ORGANIZATION OF COURSE
You will fulfill half of the 100 hour Pennsylvania Department of Education’s practicum requirement this semester by organizing three learning experiences within your school district.
A. After School Literacy Program – 10 hours for conducting formal and informal assessments, 20 hours for curriculum and instruction with small group of students (10 one hour sessions).
B. Family-school partnership – 10 hours for Family Message Journals, a family literacy gathering as well as other avenues (i.e., newsletters, conferences), and
C. Literacy coach/reading specialist observation – 10 hours for shadowing and interviewing a literacy coach and reading specialist in your district or county.
Dr. Klassen Endrizzi will visit your practicum site once or twice this semester.  Schedule a brief joint meeting for me with your school district supervisor the day I observe.
 
IV.  LEARNING EXPERIENCES
A. ATTENDANCE, PARTICIPATION, AND PROFESSIONALISM – 10%
B. AFTER SCHOOL LITERACY PROGRAM – CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION & ASSESSMENT – 45%
“Children learn to read when conditions are right.  These conditions include their relationships with books and other reading materials, and their relationships with people who will help them to read.  The conditions also include their own unique personalities, their self-image, mood, interest, expectations, and comprehension.”  (F. Smith, p. 155, Language Arts, 1999)
C. TEACHER’S NOTEBOOK – 5 %
D. FAMILY-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP – 20%
E. LITERACY COACH/READING SPECIALIST OBSERVATIONS & INTERVIEWS – 10%
F. CASE STUDY POWERPOINT PRESENTATION – 10%