Psychology Professor to Discuss Neuroeconomics

Monday, February 27, 2006

Dr. Alan Gittis, professor and chair of psychology at Westminster College, will discuss "The Costs/Benefits of Neuroeconomics: Theory and Reality" at Faculty Forum Wednesday, March 8, at 11:45 a.m. in the Sebastian Mueller Theater located in the McKelvey Campus Center.

"Neuroeconomics in the title is word-play," Gittis said.  "Theory of neuroeconomics will be related to some recent thesis projects of Westminster students who analyze patterns of choice behavior in animals emerging from cost/benefit computations in the brain. 

 "Reality of neuroeconomics deals with the funding of neuroscience projects and the difficulty of getting federal funding agencies to invest in undergraduate science education.  I will discuss both topics in my presentation."

Faculty Forum, established in 1990, serves as a venue for the exchange of ideas and information among Westminster College faculty.  Speakers present their research, teaching ideas, lectures, performances, special programs, and uses of technology to keep faculty informed about the work of colleagues from many disciplines.

Gittis, who has been with Westminster College since 1976, earned his undergraduate degree from Temple University, and his master's and Ph.D. from Ohio State University.

 The event is free and open to the public.  Contact Gittis at (724) 946-7358 or e-mail gittisa@westminster.edu for more information.

About Westminster College...
Founded in 1852 and related to the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), Westminster College is ranked among national leaders in graduation rate performance, according to U.S. News Guide to America's Best Colleges, and is one of the most affordable national liberal arts colleges in Pennsylvania. Westminster is also honored as one of "The Best 361 Colleges" and "Best in the Northeast" by The Princeton Review, and was recognized by the Templeton Guide as a "Character Building College."

Nearly 1,600 students benefit from individualized attention from dedicated faculty, while choosing from 40 majors and nearly 100 organizations on the New Wilmington, Pa. campus.


Dr. Alan Gittis