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Materials Science

Course Descriptions

CHE 117 Principles of Chemistry (SD) (4.00 SH). A course emphasizing stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear phenomena, and interactions of science and society. In the laboratory program students will investigate chemical systems, analyze observations and data, devise explanations, and communicate results. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and an acceptable score on a placement test or completion of CHE 111 or ES 160 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

CHE 180 Inorganic Chemistry (4.00 SH). A study of the energetics of the bonding and reactions of inorganic compounds. Emphasis is given to the periodicity of the chemical and physical properties of the elements. Major themes of the course include effective nuclear charge, lattice energy, charge density, acid/base theories, and the descriptive chemistry of all of the elements. The laboratory includes the investigation of the energetics of reactions, the synthesis and analysis of coordination compounds, qualitative chemistry, and the communication of results. Prerequisite: CHE 117 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.

CHE 230 Chemical Analysis (4.00 SH). A study of the theoretical foundation and skills necessary for the solution of problems encountered in the area of quantitative chemical analysis, including classical and modern methods. Emphasis is given to the evaluation and presentation of data, sampling, equilibrium dynamics of analytically important reactions, experimental design, volumetric techniques, absorption and emission spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and analytical separations. Examples and laboratory exercises will include environmental air, soil and water systems. Prerequisites: CHE 117, and MTH 135, MTH 150 or BIO 206 (may be co-requisite) with grades of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters. (Also listed as ES 230.)

CHE 261 Organic Chemistry I (4.00 SH). An overview of organic chemistry. Organic molecules are compared by their functional group, focusing on nomenclature, physical properties, and the major chemical reactions used in synthesis and identification. Emphasis is also given to the areas of acidity, basicity, stereochemistry, aromaticity, and spectroscopy. Laboratory activities involve techniques for determination of physical and chemical properties, and methods of purification. Prerequisite: CHE 117 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.

CHE 262 Organic Chemistry II (4.00 SH). A study of organic reactivity. This course details organic molecules by reactivity and emphasizes the differences between organic reactions. Specifically, organic reactions will be surveyed by type of reaction keying on the movement of electrons, molecular orbitals, and energetics. Spectroscopy is employed to monitor structural changes. Laboratory activities also probe the reactivity of molecules and explore the relationship between structure and reactivity. Prerequisite: CHE 261 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Spring Semester.

CHE 340 Instrumental Analysis (4.00 SH). A study of modern instrumentation used in the investigation of chemical systems. The theory, design, and application of spectroscopic, electrochemical, and surface analysis techniques are discussed. Basic electronics and the relationship between signal and noise are also discussed. Prerequisites: CHE 230 and PHY 142 or 152. Offered Fall Semester, alternate years.

CHE 391 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4.00 SH). A study of symmetry and group theory with applications to molecular orbital theory, the analysis of electronic and vibrational spectra, and reaction mechanisms. Organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and materials chemistry are also discussed. Prerequisites: CHE 180, CHE 330. Offered Spring Semester, alternate years.

CHE 451 Advanced Lab: Synthesis & Analysis (4.00 SH). A project-oriented course that integrates advanced synthetic and analytical methodologies. Projects may include inorganic synthesis, multi-step organic synthesis, and analysis of samples using various spectroscopy and chromatography instrumentation. This course includes participation in a weekly seminar. Prerequisites: CHE 180, 230, 261. Offered fall semesters.

CHE 452 Advanced Lab: Research Methods (2.00 SH). A writing intensive course that teaches students to write like a chemist. This included writing a scientific research paper, a research proposal, and a research poster. Students participate in a pilot project to initiate their senior project and then write a proposal and poster based on this pilot project. This course includes participation in a weekly seminar. Prerequisites: CHE 180, CHE 230, and CHE 261. Offered Spring semesters.

CS 151 Principles of Computer Science I (4.00 SH). A broad introduction to the discipline of computer science, with attention given to many components of the field. Topics include an examination of subfields of computer science, computer representation of data, an introduction to hardware structure, and fundamentals of programming languages. Special emphasis is given to techniques for problem solving and algorithm development, designing and implementing computer programs, and software analysis and verification methods. Prerequisite: prior programming experience recommended. (Offered Fall semester.)

ES 230 Chemical Analysis (4.00 SH). A study of the theoretical foundation and skills necessary for the solution of problems encountered in the area of quantitative chemical analysis, including classical and modern methods. Emphasis is given to the evaluation and presentation of data, sampling, equilibrium dynamics of analytically important reactions, experimental design, volumetric techniques, absorption and emission spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and analytical separations. Examples and laboratory exercises will include environmental air, soil and water systems. Prerequisites: CHE 117, and MTH 135 or MTH 150 or BIO 206 (may be co-requisite). (Also listed as CHE 230.)

MSE 211 Statics & Mechanics of Materials (4.00 SH). A study of rigid and deformable bodies in static equilibrium, considering both the external forces that lead to the state of static equilibrium and the internal forces responsible for the deformations of solid bodies,

MSE 221 Prin of Electrical Engineering (4.00 SH).

MSE 231 Science & Engineering of Materials (4.00 SH).

MSE 241 Semiconductor Physics (4.00 SH). An introduction to the fundamentals of solid state physics as applied to semiconductor materials and devices.

MTH 152 Calculus II (QR) (4.00 SH). This course will focus on the fundamentals of integral calculus, including techniques and applications of integration. Other topics include infinite series and introductory topics from differential equations. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 150 or the permission of the instructor. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 250 Calculus III (QR) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the calculus of several variables. Topics include the geometry of three-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 152. (Offered Fall semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 253 Differential Equations (4.00 SH). The study of differential equations and their applications in the natural sciences. Topics include linear differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transformations, systems of equations, an introduction to partial differential equations, boundary value problems and application of differential equations. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 250. (Offered Spring semester, odd years.)

MTH 261 Linear Algebra (4.00 SH). An introduction to matrix algebra and general vector spaces. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrix operations and properties, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, linear transformations, linear independence and span, bases, coordinate systems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, inner product spaces, and orthogonality. Prerequisite: C- or better inMTH 250. (Offered Spring semester.)

PHY 151 Principles Physics I (SD) (4.00 SH). The first semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics). Basic principles used in both semesters are introduced in the first semester. Some basic concepts of calculus may be introduced as needed. A laboratory is included. Co-requisite: MTH 150 or higher. Offered Fall Semester. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

PHY 152 Principles Physics II (4.00 SH). The second semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics). Calculus methods will be used. A laboratory is included. Prerequisite: PHY 151; Co-requisite: MTH 152 or higher. Offered Spring Semester.

PHY 311 Thermal Physics (4.00 SH). A study of the behavior of systems containing large numbers of particles. The course emphasizes the analysis of model systems using statistical mechanics. From that analysis, the thermodynamic behavior of real systems can be understood. Prerequisite: PHY 152; Co-requisite: MTH 250. Offered Fall Semester, alternate years.

PHY 313 Modern Physics (4.00 SH). Modern Physics offers a broad introduction to the major developments in physics in the 20th century. Topics covered include special relativity, wave-particle duality, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, solid state physics, nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, and other specialized topics. Prerequisite: PHY 152. Offered Fall Semester, alternate years.

PHY 321 Experimental Physics I (2.00 SH). Experiments from many fields such as optics, nuclear, and atomic physics. Fundamental experimental techniques will be introduced. Computer automation methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: PHY 152. Offered Fall/Spring semesters, alternate years.

PHY 322 Experimental Physics II (2.00 SH). Experiments from many fields such as optics, nuclear, and atomic physics. Fundamental experimental techniques will be introduced. Computer automation methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: PHY 152. Offered Fall/Spring semesters, alternate years.

 

What can you do with a Materials Science degree?

Imagine yourself in a career with an organization that produce metals, ceramics, plastics, and rubber. Materials scientists also work in the coatings, paint, biomedical, electronics, and alternative fuel industries.