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International Studies

Course Descriptions

International Studies Courses


IS 101 Intro to International Studies (HC) (4.00 SH).

 

Supporting Courses


ECO 150 Economic Reasoning (ST) (4.00 SH). Fundamental economic concepts and theories of supply and demand, resource allocation, taxation, international trade, externalities, public goods, market models, and labor markets. An emphasis on applications in both public policy and individual decision making will be recurrent throughout the course. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

FR 202 Intermediate French II (FL) (4.00 SH). A continuation of the skills and emphases stated for FR 201. Prerequisite: FR 201 or consent of instructor.

FR 301 French Adv Conversation/Comp I (4.00 SH). A course in oral and written practice at the advanced level, designed to develop fluency in speaking and writing French. The emphasis is on the reading of cultural and literary texts, as well as current periodicals, which serve as the basis for group discussion and for writing short essays. Prerequisite: FR 202 or consent of instructor.

FR 302 French Adv Conversation/Comp II (4.00 SH).

GER 202 Intermediate German II (4.00 SH).

HIS 241 Early Modern France (ST) (4.00 SH). This period in European history witnesses the radical changes in politics, thought, society, and warfare. Special emphasis is given to absolutism, enlightenment, the French Revolution, Napoleon, the rise of the middle class, and the importance of science and technology. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

HIS 242 England:Age of Elizabeth (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the transition from medieval to modern forms of political and economic life from circa 1485-1714. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 243 England:The Age of Empire (4.00 SH). A study of the emergence of modern England, with emphasis on the development of political democracy, the rise and fall of the British Empire, and the social and cultural history of the Victorian Age.

HIS 245 19th Century Europe (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the political, social, economic, and diplomatic background of Europe from the Napoleonic Era to the close of the century. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 246 Twentieth-Century Europe (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the political, economic, and cultural development of Europe from the opening of the century to the present. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 251 Medieval & Early Mod Russia (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the political, economic, and cultural development of Russia from the earliest times to 1860. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 252 Modern Russia (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of the late Imperial structure and an analysis of the origin, development, and character of the Soviet state and society. Particular attention will be paid to the post-Soviet period (since the collapse of the USSR in 1991). Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 253 History of Religion in Russia (RP) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the Eastern Orthodox tradition, with particular attention to how it evolved and was celebrated in Russia. Students will explore the dogmas, liturgy, iconography, and history of the Orthodox Church, and attention will be paid to the relationship between the Church and the State, particularly under communism. Attention will also be given to a comparison of Orthodoxy with Western Christian faiths. (Also listed as REL 211.) Meets Religious and Philosophical Though Intellectual Perspective requirement (RP).

HIS 262 Japan (ST) (4.00 SH). A survey of the cultural, political, social, and economic history of Japan from the earliest times to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the period since the Meiji Revolution. Topics will include: the Shogunate and the imperial system; Buddhism and Shintoism; Japanese militarism; and Japan as a modern economic power. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

HIS 271 Latin America to 1825 (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of Latin America from its indigenous beginnings, through the colonial period, to the conclusion of the wars for independence. The influences of the indigenous and Iberian cultures on the development of the region are compared. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 272 Latin America From 1825 (HC) (4.00 SH). A study of Latin America from 1825 to the present with emphasis upon its political, cultural, and economic importance in world affairs. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 281 Africa to 1800 (HC) (4.00 SH). A survey of African history from the earliest times until 1800. The course examines major political, economic and cultural developments across the continent, including human origins, the great civilizations of the first millennium, and the slave trade. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 282 Africa since 1800 (HC) (4.00 SH). A survey of African history from 1800 to the 21st century. The course traces the major political, economic, and cultural developments on the continent, including European imperialism, African independence, and Africa in the age of globalization. Meets Humanity and Culture Intellectual Perspective requirement (HC).

HIS 305 Marr, Fam, Sex in History (ST) (4.00 SH). A study of family over time, using legal, cultural, and socio-historical resources. Students will examine the historical roots of current social controversies, including abortion, divorce, child-rearing, family structures, and women’s roles in society. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

HIS 307 Monarchs & Dynasties (4.00 SH). This course examines the role dynasties have played in the development of the modern nation-state. To accomplish this objective, students will examine not only institutions such as the royal court, but also will look at the family structure and anthropology of dynasties. The interplay between the private and the public roles of monarchical rulers is the central concern of this course, which will focus in particular on Russia, the Habsburg Empire, France and Britain. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

HIS 308 Cold War (4.00 SH). The second half of the 20th century was dominated by the rivalry of the United States with the Soviet Union. This course will research such questions as the following: How did this almost deadly confrontation start? How and why did it end? Where were the “hot spots” of the cold war, and why were they there? The course will also look at the domestic impact of the American-Soviet confrontation and explore such questions as how anti-communism affected American culture, Americans’ view of themselves, and ultimately America’s identity.

HIS 311 South Africa (4.00 SH). This course will explore the question of how South Africans can negotiate their past, which was marked by racial inequality and injustice, and form a new non-racial, democratic nation. To answer this question, the interactions of race, class, gender, and culture in South Africa from the 17th century to the present will be examined. Primary documents, films, music, and literature will help to illuminate the interplay between history and memory in South Africa.

HIS 312 Advanced Topics in History & Film (4.00 SH). This course explores, on a rotating basis, advanced themes in history (e.g., nationalism, war and other types of conflict, religion and society, etc.) through the viewing and study of films on historical subjects. The focus of the course is on both the cinematography of the films (i.e., the art and craft of filmmaking) and on matters of the historical accuracy and the historical context of the films. It is strongly recommended that students who are not history majors or minors take HIS 101 or 102 before taking this course.

HIS 410 Historical Methods & Analysis (4.00 SH). An introduction to the research methods of the historian. This course will examine the nature and use of historical sources (primary and secondary), develop mastery of presentation and reference conventions, and introduce the ancillary historical disciplines (e.g., paleography, numismatics, vexillology, etc.). Although the emphasis is on skills, the course is topical, examining the history of a selected period, event, or culture. Required of history majors (normally taken in the sophomore year), but open also to interested history minors.

HIS 420 Historiography (4.00 SH). This course will expose students to classic works of history and introduce various schools of thought (e.g., Marxist, structuralist, annalistic, economic, feminist/gender) that characterize modern historical knowledge. Required of history majors (normally taken in the junior year). Prerequisite: C- or better in HIS 101, 102, and 410 or permission of instructor.

HIS 594 Field Experience/Internship (4.00 SH). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the department chair.

PS 104 Intro to International Rel (ST) (4.00 SH). A study of politics among states and other actors who affect global relations. Once establishing a background in the concepts used to analyze world politics, students will use these concepts to explore the Cold War era, the end of that system, and several pertinent international issues in the areas of security, economics, and the environment. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PS 204 Model United Nations (1.00 SH). This course prepares students to participate in a simulation that utilizes the basic structural tenets and procedural framework of the United Nations. Students develop familiarity with parliamentary procedures and a working knowledge of the national interests of member states. Students either attend a national Model United Nations conference or serve as conference staff for the Westminster College Model United Nations high school conference. Delegates work as diplomats, representing various countries and working towards solutions to various international problems. Conference staff members prepare a simulation experience and host committee sessions for area high school students. This course may be repeated for up to a total of four semester hours.

PS 232 European Politics (4.00 SH). A comparative study of the political systems and current challenges facing selected European powers. The patterns of political culture, political interests, political power, and public policy are analyzed. In addition, the project of European integration (the European Union) will be studied, and its current and future relations with the United States investigated.

PS 233 Politics in Developing Countries (4.00 SH). Selected countries from the Third World will be studied to analyze the politics of change in the developing countries as they face the complex world of the international system. In particular, these issues will be studied: political instability; money management, inflation, and foreign debt; population pressures on limited resources; ethnic problems contributing to city, rural and regional frictions; asymmetrical economic development; and foreign policy issues relating to trade and diplomacy with industrialized countries of the world.

PS 235 African Politics (4.00 SH). A study of the interaction between politics and social structures in Africa. Topics will include political organization in pre-modern Africa, the development and impact of slavery, the operations and impact of European colonialism, the struggle for independence, the nature of the African state, the operation of democratic and authoritarian governments, the role of women, and the effects of AIDS.

PS 236 Russian Politics (ST) (4.00 SH). This course introduces students to important issues in contemporary Russian politics including the development of its political, economic and social institutions. Students will examine the historical development of Russia’s governing institutions; compare the Russian Federation to other post-Soviet republics, and consider Russia’s regional and global significance. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PS 254A Seminar:Nationalism (4.00 SH).

PS 254C Seminar Comparative Politics (2.00 SH).

PS 255 Seminar International Politics (4.00 SH). Work in selected areas. These areas include PS 251 Seminar in Politics and Behavior; PS 252 Seminar in American Politics; PS 253 Seminar in Political Philosophy; PS 254 Seminar in Comparative Politics; PS 255 Seminar in International Politics. Special topics related to the selected area to be offered are announced prior to each registration period.

PS 255A Seminar:Int'l Political Economy (4.00 SH).

PS 331 Geopolitics (ST) (4.00 SH). This course reviews traditional understanding of geopolitics, but moves beyond examining how geography impacts the projection of military power; addressing broader issues regarding the relationship between territory and international conflict. Particular attention will be paid to how nationalism and globalization have transformed the relationship between geography and war. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

PS 332 U.S. Foreign Policy (4.00 SH). An exploration of the actors, institutions, and processes that shape the making of contemporary U.S. foreign policy. The course begins with an overview of Cold War foreign policy, and then focuses on the challenges facing American policy in the post-Cold War era. Special attention is given to the continuities and changes in the political processes through which foreign policy is made, and different theoretical approaches to the explanation of United States foreign policy. Prerequisite: PS 104 or permission of instructor.

PS 342 Politics & Economy (4.00 SH). An examination of the manifold relationships between political life and economic organization, with an emphasis on advanced capitalist societies. The course will consider major theories about the relationship between government and the economy, explore the history and variety of relationships between the state and the market economy, evaluate the impact of economic change on political life, and discuss some of the pressing contemporary issues in this area, such as fiscal policy and government deficits, free trade/protectionism and international economic interdependence, monetary policy, government regulation of the economy, and questions of poverty and inequality. Prerequisite: PS 101 or permission of instructor.

PS 431 International Law & Organization (4.00 SH). A study of selected international institutions that have been constructed to address challenges faced by the world’s states. The course will introduce the student to several theories of international cooperation and explore the validity of these approaches in explaining behavior in the United Nations system (which consists of many international organizations). Students will leave the course with an understanding of the structures of these organizations, as well as a sense of how and why they work and sometimes fail to work. Topical areas will include peacekeeping, arms control and disarmament (e.g., nuclear weapons, biological and chemical warfare), development and trade, social and humanitarian issues (e.g., refugees, drug trafficking, transnational crime), and legal issues (e.g., war criminals, asylum). Prerequisite: PS 104 or permission of instructor.

SOC 215 Women Cross-Cultural Persp (ST) (4.00 SH). This course examines the contemporary situations of women in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America, with particular attention to how their economic, political, family, and religious roles and dominant cultural ideologies influence their world-views, opportunities and experiences. Particular attention is paid to how women themselves construct and experience their lives in various cultural contexts. The experience of societal development within these nations, and its particular consequences for women, will be highlighted throughout. Meets Social Thought and Tradition Intellectual Perspective requirement (ST).

SOC 304 Social Change (4.00 SH). An investigation into processes by which large-scale modifications of societies occur, current thinking about social evolution, changes in modern society, and development in developing countries. Prerequisite: One lower-level sociology or criminal justice studies course or permission of instructor.

SOC 594 Field Experience/Internship (4.00 SH).

SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II (4.00 SH). A continuation of the skills and emphases stated for SPA 201. Prerequisite: SPA 201 or consent of instructor.

SPA 301 Spanish Adv Conv/Comp I (FL) (4.00 SH). A course in oral and written practice at the advanced level, designed to develop fluency in speaking and writing Spanish. The emphasis is on the reading of cultural and literary texts, as well as current periodicals, which serve as the basis for group discussion and for writing short essays. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or consent of instructor.

SPA 302 Spanish Adv Conversation/Comp II (4.00 SH). A continuation of the skills and emphases stated for SPA 301. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

 

What can you do with an International Studies degree?

Imagine yourself an ambassador, cultural anthropologist, ESL teacher, international salesperson, international intelligence analyst, international news reporter, or transportation specialist.