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English

Course Descriptions

English Courses:

ENG 101–199 Studies in Literature (4 SH). Studies in English, American, world or comparative literature, or in specific literary genres and themes. Individual sections experiment with different approaches and topics. The times and a brief description of each course is provided each semester. These courses are designed primarily for non-English majors. More than one ENG 101–199 may be taken for credit, as long as each course is different. Designated 101–199 courses receive Intellectual Perspective credit.

ENG 101 Biography/Autobiography
ENG 102 C: Children’s Literature
ENG 104 War Literature
ENG 105 Who Am I?
ENG 107 Detective Fiction
ENG 108 American Playwrights
ENG 109 The Sporting Spirit
ENG 110 Holocaust Literature
ENG 111 Women Writers
ENG 112 Adaptation of Literature/Film
ENG 113 Shakespeare
ENG 114 The Study of the Short Story
ENG 116 It’s Monstrous
ENG 119 Arthurian Legend
ENG 120 Law Literature and Film
ENG 122 The Study of Poetry
ENG 123 Gay Literature
ENG 124 African American Drama
ENG 127 British Literary Legacies: Circles and Sites
ENG 128 Freud, Fantasy, and Interpretation
ENG 129 Hispanic American Literature
ENG 131 Nature Writing
ENG 133 Adolescent Literature
ENG 136 Classic Greek Literature
ENG 137 Genetics in Literature
ENG 138 19th Century Literature
ENG 140 Utopian/Distopian
ENG 142 Fantasy, Fairytales, and Folklore
ENG 144 Contemporary Literature
ENG 145 African Literature
ENG 146 Mind Reading: Literature and Psychology
ENG 147 Disability Literature
ENG 148 Sexuality in Film
ENG 149 Rebels/Deviants
ENG 152 The London Novel

ENG 201 English Grammar (4 SH). A study of contemporary approaches to grammatical terminology and analysis, designed primarily for prospective elementary and secondary teachers.

ENG 220 Teaching of Literature and Grammar in Secondary Schools (4 SH). A course in teaching secondary literature and grammar for senior English majors/secondary education minors. Students wishing to teach at the secondary school level will survey required course texts and develop strategies for teaching literature, grammar, and writing. In the process, students will share research into secondary sources in these areas. They will also design group projects and present them to their peers. This course allows future secondary English teachers to combine their experience studying texts, grammar and writing as English majors with their assignments in education courses, preparing them more completely for classroom experience. Prerequisites: Declared English major/secondary education minor and senior standing. (Also listed as EDU 220.)

ENG 240 Seminar: Introduction to Literary Studies and Critical Theory, British Literature (4 SH). This course is designed to immerse entering English majors and minors in the materials, methods, and current issues of the discipline. Working with British literature, students are introduced to critical approaches they will continue to use in upper level English courses. A variety of written and oral assignments help students develop their skills in the discipline. It is suggested, though not required, that students take this course before taking ENG 250. Required of all English majors and minors.

ENG 250 Seminar: Introduction to Literary Studies and Critical Theory, American Literature (4 SH). This course is designed to immerse entering English majors and minors in the materials, methods, and current issues of the discipline. Working with American literature, students are introduced to critical approaches they will continue to use in upper level English courses. A variety of written and oral assignments help students develop their skills in the discipline. It is suggested, though not required, that students take this course after taking ENG 240. Required of all English majors and minors.

ENG 301-351 Studies in Context (4 SH). Prepared by the Introduction to Literary Studies and Critical Theory courses to read individual works closely, students at the 300s level investigate the relationship between texts and the contexts within which they are produced. While these context courses are not seminars, they still call for the development of self-awareness and, consequently, self-reliance. Identifying contexts that are both familiar and foreign challenges students to take part in an investigation of their reading and writing experiences in ways that recall, broaden, and deepen the investigations begun in ENG 240. Through the context courses, majors and minors explore their own cultural context and the cultural assumptions that permeate their ways of making and responding to texts. Prerequisite/co-requisite: successful completion of ENG 240 and 250.

ENG 301 Shakespeare & Co.
ENG 302 American Landscape
ENG 303 The Victorians
ENG 306 Social Drama
ENG 307 The Family
ENG 308 Tragic Vision
ENG 310 Jane Austen
ENG 312 Women Writers
ENG 313 Children’s Literature
ENG 316 Pan American Literature
ENG 317 Traditions
ENG 318 African-American Literature
ENG 319 After Crusoe
ENG 323 Emerson & Thoreau
ENG 324 Whitman & Dickinson
ENG 325 World Fiction
ENG 326 Contemporary Poetry
ENG 327 British Drama
ENG 328 The Empire Writes Back
ENG 329 American Gothic
ENG 331 The Roaring Twenties
ENG 334 The London Novel

ENG 401–451 Seminars (4 SH). These seminars study literary texts from several critical and theoretical stances. The courses help students develop strategies for assessing the ways that meaning becomes evident in texts, in readers, and in writers. In addition to reading and interpreting texts within contexts, the 400s seminars regard works through or in the light of perspectives offered by critical theories. Not only do students in these seminars complete a higher degree of creative and critical thinking, but they also participate more fully in leading the courses. The inquiry into theory, and when appropriate, its application, stresses independent assessment, peer evaluation, and assertion of ethical choices as they pertain to meaning and contexts. Prerequisite: successful completion of at least two ENG 300s courses.

ENG 401 Drama Criticism
ENG 402 Narrative Theory
ENG 403 Cultural Criticism
ENG 404 Film Criticism
ENG 405 Feminism
ENG 406 Poetics
ENG 407 Byron in Context
ENG 408 Reader Response
ENG 409 Textual Criticism
ENG 410 Art and the Artist
ENG 411 Ecocriticism
ENG 414 Tragedy
ENG 415 John Irving
ENG 417 The Epic
ENG 418 Shakespeare: The History Plays
ENG 419 Shakespeare: The Tragedies
ENG 422 Psychoanalysis, Gender and Culture
ENG 423 Hemingway and Faulkner
ENG 425 Modern American Poets
ENG 426 Medieval Literature
ENG 427 Empire, Revised
ENG 428 Shakespeare
ENG 429 Forming Content

ENG 590-594 Field Experience/Internship (1-4 SH). These courses are designed to foster on-campus or off-campus participation in a variety of areas. Students select experiences under the guidance of an adviser and are encouraged to consider community service projects as well as more traditional internships and field experiences related more closely to the English major. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ENG 601 English Capstone: Advanced Study I (4 SH). A course concentrating on the advanced bibliographical tools available to students of literary texts. Students will review, expand, deepen, and broaden their familiarity with library resources and research methods suited particularly to the creation and study of literary texts. The course will culminate in each student’s production of a comprehensive proposal for the final independent study project to be completed as part of the requirement for ENG 602. (See also guidelines for College Honors in English.) Prerequisites: advanced junior standing and permission of the department. Prerequisite/co-requisite: ENG 400.

ENG 602 English Capstone: Advanced Study II (4 SH). An independent study, supervised by a department member, which completes the research proposal developed in ENG 601. The student produces a major paper, series of essays, and creative work and presents the results to the department in an appropriate forum. Prerequisites : successful completion of ENG 601 and senior standing.

ENG 620-624 Independent Study (1-4 SH).
ENG 660, 670, 680, 690 Honors Project (1-4 SH)

 

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