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Education

Westminster College’s education department prepares students to teach in Pre- Kindergarten through 4th grade classrooms or in high school. The program offers multiple opportunities to interact with preschool and/or K-12 students during the course of study. This sequential program offers experiences that expand student’s base knowledge about classroom interaction while offering comprehensive, contemporary educational theory. Required field experiences provide some full-time experience in a real classroom with students in general as well as special education environments. Sophomores and juniors in the Early Childhood/Special Education major work with both children and adolescents. Students interested in teaching at the secondary level select a disciplinary minor (biology, chemistry, English, etc.) and then take the accompanying program in secondary education. Music students major in music education. The senior year Capstone project culminates in four months of full-time teaching mentored by a master teacher. At the end of the degree students prepare for the Pennsylvania state-mandated certification examinations.

Requirements for the Major in Pre-K Early Childhood Education and PreK-8 Special Education

Early Childhood PreK-4 Education courses:

ECE 201 Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education
ECE 203 Diversity within Family-School-Community Partnerships
ECE 321 Math for Preschool Years
ECE 322 Math for Primary Grades
ECE 331 Language Development Pre-K
ECE 332 Language Development K-4
ECE 341 Emergent Literacy
ECE 342 Literacy in the Primary Classroom
ECE 352 Teaching Social Studies PreK-8
ECE 352 Teaching Social Studies PreK-8
ECE 605 Early Childhood PreK-4
EDU 231 Educational Psychology
EDU 311 Teaching Science in the Schools
EDU 562-572 Early Childhood PreK-4 Education Field Experience II
ELL 206 English Language Learners
PED 301 Early Childhood Movement
PED 302 Adapted Physical Education
PSY 219 Early Childhood Development
Note: A practicum experience course in Early Childhood Pre-K is also required.

Special Education PreK-8 courses:

SED 201 Foundations of Special Education
SED 402 Behavior Management in Special Education
SED 404 Reading Strategies for Exceptional Children
SED 411 Legal Issues and Assessment in Special Education
SED 412 Assessment Methods in Special Education
SED 413 High Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education
SED 414 Low Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education
SED 462 Observation and Assessment PreK-8 Special Education
SED 572 PreK-8 Special Education Field Experience III
SED 605 Special Education PreK-8 Capstone
Note: A practicum experience course in Special Education PreK-8 is also required.

Courses in the following disciplines are also required for certification (these also count as part of the Westminster Plan curriculum):

Mathematics
Life Science
Physical Science
Geography
American History
Visual/Performing Arts
Composition/Literature

And recommended elective courses include:

A music course OR an art course OR a theatre course
CJS 201 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology
SOC 209 Minority-Majority Relations
EDU 203 Multicultural Education
PSY 101 Introduction to General Psychology OR PSY 281 Principles of Learning and Memory

See the Undergraduate Catalog for specific requirements and recommended courses.

Requirements for the Secondary Education (Minor)

Students beginning academic year 2014-2015 who plan to qualify for the secondary school teaching certificate declare a minor in secondary education during their freshman year or upon declaring a major. To this end they should consult with the Department of Education during their first year. For general academic purposes, students remain under the guidance of the department in which they are majoring.

Secondary Education Courses:

EDU 231 Educational Psychology
EDU 351 Reading in the Content Areas
EDU 451 Teaching in the Secondary School
EDU 452 Student Teaching and Seminar-Secondary
EDU 453 eight credits (For students completing two certification areas)
EDU 582–592 Field ExperienceóSecondary Education
ELL 206 English Language Learners
SED 201 Foundations of Special Education
SED 572 PreK-8 Special Education Field Experience III

And the following disciplinary requirements:

Mathematics (College-level), Six credits
English Composition and Literature, Six credits

And recommended elective courses include:

PSY 101 Introduction to General Psychology
PSY 221 Childhood and Adolescence OR PSY 281 Principles of Learning and Memory

Course Descriptions

Education Courses:

ECE 201 Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education (4 SH). This course will focus on the current trends and practices of early childhood education programs which serve children from birth to age nine. Professional development, history and theories, programming, development and learning, and the special needs of young children will be addressed as they relate to early childhood education.

ECE 203 Diversity within Family-School-Community Partnerships (3 SH). The focus of this course in on understanding how families and communities are significant contexts for childrenís development and school success. Based upon these insights, students will collaboratively explore ways to build bridges of understanding between diverse schools, families, and communities. Student engagement with diverse families at a Family Reading Night as well as in field experiences will allow the student to critically reflect on a familyís funds of knowledge in light of different cultural ways of knowing. The students will use these discoveries to develop culturally responsive explorations for their future classrooms.

ECE 321 Math for Preschool Years (2 SH). This course is an introduction to the content and methods of teaching mathematics in the PreK years which meets the PA Early Childhood Education standards. Instructional strategies are based on a constructivist approach emphasizing problem solving, estimation and making sense of mathematics. The role of technology in instruction, modern trends in mathematics education, research, and application of skills are included. The use of age-appropriate manipulative materials in a laboratory situation and group problem solving are developed as classroom models of instruction. Practicum experience required.

ECE 322 Math for Primary Grades (2 SH). This course is an introduction to the content and methods of teaching mathematics in the primary grades which meets the PA Academic and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards. Instructional strategies are based on a constructivist approach emphasizing problem solving, estimation and making sense of mathematics. The role of technology in instruction, modern trends in mathematics education, research, and application of skills are included. The use of age-appropriate manipulative materials in a laboratory situation and group problem solving are developed as classroom models of instruction. Practicum experience required.

ECE 331 Language Development Pre-K (2 SH). This course is designed to examine the developmental sequence of language acquisition and knowledge of phonics from PreK-4. It will also examine the language arts receptive and productive categories of oral, written, and visual language as part of a classroom curriculum.

ECE 332 Language Development K-4 (2 SH). This course is designed to examine the developmental sequence of language acquisition and knowledge of phonics from grades K-4. It will also examine the language arts receptive and productive categories of oral, written, and visual language as part of a classroom curriculum.

ECE 341 Emergent Literacy (2 SH). An introductory study of various theories of emergent literacy and literacy development. Students examine how childrenís literacy roots evolve from their home and community lives. The role of comprehension and phonics instruction within guided and shared reading experiences is studied. Emphasis is placed upon building family-school partnerships. Practicum experience required.

ECE 342 Literacy in the Primary Classroom (2 SH). An introductory study of various literacy theories. Emphasis is placed on exploring how literacy curriculum, instruction, and assessment inform each other. Systematic evaluation tools for proficient and struggling readers are explored. Practicum experience required.

ECE 352 Teaching Social Studies PreK-8 (4 SH). Social Studies PreK-8 is a required course with the goal of equipping prospective PreK-4 Early Childhood teachers with tools for teaching social studies to children. This course requires that the student works to develop initial ideas of social studies teaching which include methods of content selection, methods of teaching, and be able to explain the critical role of social studies education in the school curriculum. Students will develop a social studies unit that will be taught during practicum.

ECE 362 Observation and Assessment PreK-4 (2 SH). This course is designed to provide preservice teacher candidates with hands-on experiences in observing and assessing children. In PreK-4 settings, students will teach lessons, administer assessment instruments, use curriculum based measurement, and evaluate and interpret the results for instructional purposes.

ECE 605/SED 605 Early Childhood PreK-4 and Special Education PreK-8 Capstone (6 SH). Student teaching (12 SH) is a supervised dual student teaching experience open to Early Childhood PreK-4 and Special Education PreK-8 majors who have completed the pattern of required courses. Students are required to participate in related seminars.

EDU 203 Multicultural Education (2 SH). The class provides pre-service teachers with opportunities to explore ways to understand and appreciate their own culture and elementary studentsí diverse cultures. Since learning occurs in a multicultural world with many ways of knowing, opportunities are needed to critically examine beliefs and classroom practices that value each studentís unique cultural background. Literacy experiences with multicultural childrenís literature between pre-service teachers and elementary students build a foundation for future interactions with students.

EDU 204 Educational Technology (2 SH). Introduction to the use of production software with special attention to uses teachers would make of the Internet, word processing, spreadsheets, data bases, and presentation graphics. Students are expected to complete projects using each of the described elements singly or in an integrated approach. Ethical use of computer software will be stressed. Smartboard technology, iPad, and e-readers will be part of the curriculum.

EDU 220 Teaching of Literature and Grammar in Secondary Schools (4 SH). A course in teaching secondary literature and grammar for senior English majors/secondary education minors. Students wishing to teach at the secondary school level survey required course texts and develop strategies for teaching literature, grammar, and writing. In the process, students share research into secondary sources in these areas. They also design group projects and present them to their peers. This course allows future secondary English teachers to combine their experience studying texts, grammar and writing as English majors with their assignments in education courses, preparing them more completely for classroom experience. Prerequisites: Declared English major/secondary education minor and senior standing. (Also listed as ENG 220.)

EDU 231 Educational Psychology (4 SH). A study of the teaching and learning process for students preparing to teach children and adolescents. The units of the course include learning, instruction, human development, motivation, management, assessment and the learner. A practicum with children and/or adolescents is included. This course is offered by the Department of Education and does not count toward a psychology major, minor or as a course within the discipline.

EDU 311 Teaching Science in the Schools (4 SH). Introduction to the content and methods of science in the PreK-8 schools. Careful attention is given to the organization and conduct of meaningful science learning experiences at the various age levels. The roles of inquiry and discovery teaching, hands-on-learning activities, and current research are studied as they relate to childrenís acquisition of science concepts. Special attention is given to the treatment of values in science. Prerequisites: life science and physical science or permission of instructor. For Early Childhood PreK-4/ Special Education PreK-8 majors.

EDU 351 Reading in the Content Areas (4 SH). This course is an overview of the reading and writing processes with an emphasis on assessment and the application of the strategies used to teach reading and writing in the content area. This course includes a tutoring component with middle and high school students in reading and writing in the content areas.

EDU 451 Teaching in the Secondary School (4 SH). The senior level course in preparing the student for student teaching and for professional experiences seeks to develop competencies in the following: formulation of instructional objectives; organization and evaluation of learning experiences; preparation of lesson plans; use and preparation of instructional materials; use of educational media; development of techniques for whole class, small group, and individual instruction, including strategies for inclusion; videotaped experiences in microteaching; methods of teaching applied to academic areas; the role of the teacher; development of a philosophy of education; study of the role of the professional organizations; and the ethics of the teaching profession.

EDU 452 Student Teaching and Seminar-Secondary (16 SH). A supervised course in student teaching open to secondary education majors who have completed the pattern of required courses. Students are required to participate in related evening/Saturday morning seminars. In addition to the regular tuition and fees, there is a student teaching fee. Prerequisite: Completion of all certification courses.

EDU 562-572 Early Childhood PreK-4 Education Field Experience II (2 SH). This course is an off-campus experience in PreK-8 school setting intended to provide the student with opportunities to participate with teachers and children in classrooms. For Early Childhood PreK-4/Special Education PreK-8 majors. Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one semester and one education course at Westminster College and have a GPA of at least 2.800.

EDU 582ñ592 Field ExperienceóSecondary Education (2 SH). An off-campus experience in secondary school with opportunities to participate with teachers and adolescents in grades 7-12. For secondary education minors. Prerequisites for first field experience: completed at least one semester and one education course at Westminster College and have at least a 2.500 GPA.

EDU 610, 611 Advanced Topics (4 SH).

EDU 620-624 Independent Study (1-4 SH).

ELL 206 English Language Learners (3 SH). The course is designed to infuse the teachers competencies related to meeting the instructional needs of English language learners. The course will explore the language, culture, standards-based instruction, assessment, and professionalism in order to understand and teach linguistically diverse learners effectively. Certification students PreK-12 are required to take this course.

PED 301 Early Childhood Movement (1 SH). This course introduces the student to the factors influencing the changes in the development and learning of motor skills from infancy ñ Grade 4. Practical laboratory activities are utilized to illustrate basic concepts of motor development and motor learning.

PED 302 Adapted Physical Education (1 SH). This course is designed to provide perspectives for teachers and special educators in the field of physical education. The student will gain an understanding of working in an adapted physical education setting. The student will learn to facilitate and enable learning in the least restrictive environment.

SED 201 Foundations of Special Education (4 SH). This course is designed as an introduction to the field of special education for students seeking careers in education. It includes such topics as: identification, placement, programming, inclusive practices, advocacy, and other topics relating to persons who have disabilities from historical, medical, educational, societal, and individual points of view.

SED 402 Behavior Management in Special Education (4 SH). This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the characteristics of students with learning and behavior problems with respect to factors that influence the instructional environment while providing classroom management theory and practical applications for students who have special needs.

SED 404 Reading Strategies for Exceptional Children (4 SH). This course is designed to provide specific instructional reading techniques and strategies to assist the learner who has been identified as being at-risk for failure due to poor reading skills or as having special needs.

SED 411 Legal Issues and Assessment in Special Education (2 SH). The focus of the course is on the analysis of legislation, litigation, and administrative rulings related to special education. The course will emphasize the development of legally sound policies and procedures to ensure an appropriate education for students with disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to use to effectively instruct children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings.

SED 412 Assessment Methods in Special Education (2 SH). The course will emphasize the development and implementation of assessment procedures for students who have disabilities. Pre-service teacher candidates will become familiar with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques to administer to effectively evaluate children who have disabilities in PreK-8 settings.

SED 413 High Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education (2 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have high incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy.

SED 414 Low Incidence Instructional Strategies in Special Education (2 SH). This course is designed to provide practical application of knowledge about learners who have low incidence disabilities, theory, best practices, regulations, and research as related to a practicum component in PreK-8 schools working with students who have special needs in a classroom setting. The goal of the courses is to assist future special educators to prepare for the unique role of a teacher in a field that is rapidly changing as a result of shifts in public school policies, school reform, questions of efficacy, limitations of resources, teacher roles and expectations, and advocacy.

SED 462 Observation and Assessment PreK-8 Special Education (2 SH). This course is designed to provide pre-service teacher candidates with hands-on experiences in observing and assessing children who have disabilities. In PreK-8 settings, students will teach lessons, progress monitor, administer assessment instruments, use curriculum based measurement, and evaluate and interpret the results for instructional purposes.

SED 572 PreK-8 Special Education Field Experience III (2 SH). This course is an off-campus experience in either a PreK-8 school or institutional setting intended to provide the student with opportunities to participate with teachers and children who have special needs in classrooms. For Early Childhood PreK-4/Special Education PreK-8 majors and other minors who desire an experience with children or youth who have disabilities. Prerequisites: Must have completed at least three semesters and two education courses at Westminster College and have a GPA of at least 2.800.

SED 605/ECE 605 Early Childhood PreK-4 and Special Education PreK-8 Capstone (6 SH). Student teaching (12 SH) is a supervised dual student teaching experience open to Early Childhood PreK-4 and Special Education PreK-8 majors who have completed the pattern of required courses. Students are required to participate in related seminars and meetings. In addition to the regular tuition and fees, there is a student teaching fee.

Supporting Education Courses:

CJS 102 Deviance (4 SH). An exploration of norm-breaking behavior and its consequences. Traditional and contemporary theories of deviance will be examined, as will particular areas of deviant behavior. The change in definitions of what is regarded as deviant will be dealt with at length.

PSY 101 Introduction to General Psychology (4 SH). Principles of human and animal behavior. The study of individual, group and institutional behavior in context. Offered every semester.

PSY 219 Early Childhood Development (4 SH). A chronological approach to the principles and theories of child development from birth-11 years of age. This course fulfills the developmental psychology requirement for early childhood education majors.

PSY 221 Childhood and Adolescence (4 SH). A topical approach to principles of human growth and development, with an emphasis on both childhood and adolescence.

PSY 281 Principles of Learning and Memory (4 SH). Analysis of the variety of mechanisms by which our behavior and our representations develop from experience. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology (4 SH). In taking this course, students will become more aware of the effects of social forces on the individual. The course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods used in the systematic study of society. Topics include: social norms, social groups, social conflict, social inequality, social institutions, social change, and the sociological perspective.

SOC 209 Minority-Majority Relations (4 SH). This course will trace the history of race as a concept, examine how racial and ethnic relations changed over time in the U.S., analyze the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination, and consider how majority-minority relations shape life chances for various groups in the U.S. and throughout the world. Some of the topics we cover include: ethnic identity, popular culture, segregation, immigration, racial profiling, and interracial relationships.

Westminster is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for the preparation of early childhood/special education, and secondary school teachers. Secondary school teachers are prepared in the following fields: biology, chemistry, social studies, English, mathematics, and physics. All secondary certifications require Preservice Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) by Pearson and the Praxis Speciality Area test. French, Latin, music, and Spanish are K-12 certifications. Early childhood/special education, and K-8 certifications require the Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) by Pearson and appropriate Specialty Area tests. Graduates may be certified to teach in other states if they select their courses to meet the requirements for certification which apply in those states. Additional information may be obtained from the Department of Education, or from the Department of Music for the music certification program.

A sequence of learning opportunities and experiences are planned by the faculty to develop personal and professional growth and to meet the requirements for teacher certification. The faculty monitor each studentís progress toward the attainment of program guidelines through course work, personal advising, supervised activities, public school practica, field experiences, and a student teaching assignment.

Students majoring in education become candidates for the B.A. degree. Students minoring in secondary education become candidates for the degree appropriate to their discipline.

Students who successfully complete the teacher education program at Westminster and the Praxis Series/Pearson Examination requirements will be recommended for certification in Pennsylvania. Students who seek certification in other states can modify their programs accordingly. Generally, the courses leading to Pennsylvania certification are similar to those required by other states.

Faculty-Student Research Project

Engaged classroom teachers explore questions that arise from their interactions with children. Education faculty members offer essential demonstrations of teachers researching key issues through faculty-student research projects. Each year Early Childhood Education and Special Education preservice teachers are invited by faculty members to join various on-going or new faculty collaborative research projects.

Public Elementary Education and Religion: A Comparative Research Study

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC) and Israel
Pre-service Teachers: Emily Tittiger, Lauren Sutton, Kearsie Doughtery
Faculty Advisors: Dr. Amy Camadrese and Mrs. Tina Keller

Inquisitive Cube

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teachers: Jessica Galanski, Julia Adams, Alaina Oprean
Faculty Advisor: Dr. P. Richardson (Math)

Bridges to Reading: Family-Teacher Literacy Conversations

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teachers: Olivia Hvizdos, Megan Carlton, and Ashley Cable
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Charlene Klassen Endrizzi

The Family Photo Project

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teachers: Elizabeth Frambes, Abigail Buckholt, Lauren McClinton, Emily Scharf
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Charlene Klassen Endrizzi

Subitizing: Developing Number Sense in the Early Childhood Setting

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teachers: Alexandra Taylor and Katie Becherer
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sararose Lynch and Mrs. Diana Reed

Teaching from the Shadows: Migrant Tutoring in Rural Pennsylvania

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC) and The National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME)
Pre-service Teachers: Kayla Hiscox, Alana Watson, Emily Chess
Faculty Advisor: Mrs. Tina Keller

A Closer Look at the Common Core

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teacher: Josh Phillian
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sararose Lynch

Attitudes Towards Individuals with Disabilities

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-Service Teacher: Megan Carlton
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Alison DuBois

Diversifying Dynamics: The Ever-changing Roles of the Public School Educator

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-Service Teacher: Megan Donaldson
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Alison DuBois

Embracing Different Cultures

Presented at Undergraduate Research and Arts Celebration (URAC)
Pre-service Teachers: Michael Pandolph, Alex Taylor and Sarah Carlson
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Alison DuBois

Westminster Student Chapter of Council for Exceptional Children

The purpose of this chapter shall be to advance the education of individuals with exceptionalities and to promote related educational, scientific, and charitable purposes. Specifically, the chapter intends to assist and provide support to the PA CEC state/provincial unit of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) in all its efforts on behalf of persons with exceptionalities, and to participate in all appropriate governance activities of CEC subject to the general supervision and control of CEC.

Core Values

CEC values:

  • The dignity and worth of all individuals.
  • Social justice, inclusiveness, and diversity.
  • Professional excellence, integrity, and accountability.
  • Rich and meaningful participation in society for all individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Effective individualized education for all individuals with exceptionalities.
  • The importance of families in the lives and education of all individuals with exceptionalities.
  • Collaboration and community building to improve outcomes.
Mission

CEC is an international community of educators who are the voice and vision of special and gifted education. Our mission is to improve the quality of life for individuals with exceptionalities and their families worldwide through professional excellence and advocacy.

Vision

CEC is a diverse, vibrant professional community working together and with others to ensure that individuals with exceptionalities are valued and included in all aspects of life. CEC is a trusted voice in shaping education policy and practice and is globally renowned for its expertise and leadership. CEC is one of the world's premiere education organizations.

Kappa Delta Pi

Kappa Delta Pi Logo

Welcome!

Kappa Delta Pi is a national honor society in education. The Delta Mu chapter was founded at Westminster College in 1937. Requirements for membership include being in the top 10-15% of your Sophomore level class, admittance to the prescribed program of teacher education, and current enrollment in an Education class. Dr. Alison DuBois is the advisor of Kappa Delta Pi.

Please visit our parent organization's website: http://www.kdp.org/

Kappa Delta Pi, International Honor Society in Education, is dedicated to scholarship and excellence in education. The Society as a community of scholars pledged to worthy ideals:

  1. Recognizes scholarship and excellence in education,
  2. Promotes the development and dissemination of worthy educational ideas and practices,
  3. Enhances the continuous growth and leadership of its diverse membership,
  4. Fosters inquiry and reflection on significant educational issues, and
  5. Maintains a high degree of professional fellowship.

Education is a vital force in any society that encourages universal welfare and individual progress. Education is likewise the cornerstone of democracy and the foundation for personal fulfillment. As an International Honor Society in Education, Kappa Delta Pi has adopted and continues to pledge fidelity to four cherished ideals: Humanity, Science, Service, and Toil.

The central ideal of fidelity to Humanity is faith in the potential of all human beings, through education, to experience more meaningful lives.Kadelpians pledge their loyalty to the ideal that young and old of every race and creed shall, through equality of educational opportunity, enjoy physical health, social and political rights, and economic justice.

Fidelity to the ideal of Science requires faithfulness to the cause of free inquiry. It implies accepting proven and replicative truth as a way of eliminating prejudice and superstition. It also implies not rushing to condemn the old and tested truth to accept ideas and practices that seem new and spectacular. Fidelity to Science requires, perhaps most of all, not distorting evidence to support a favored theory or practice.

A major incentive of the great teachers of the world has always been their desire to serve learners of all ages, classes, and races. Kadelpians pledge fidelity to Service as they enable learners and communities, through education, to achieve justice, peace, and a better quality of life for persons everywhere.

Toil is the fourth ideal to which Kadelpians pledge fidelity. With faith in the social necessity and intrinsic reward of the teaching profession, they show their will to do what must be done. If one life is given greater freedom and nobler vision, toil is not in vain.

So to teach that my words and actions inspire a will to learn; so to serve that each day may enhance the growth of exploring and expanding minds; so to live that I may guide young and old to know the truth and love the right. To the fulfillment of these ideals, I pledge my efforts and loyalty.

The commonwealth requires a battery of examinations for teacher certification candidates. For early childhood/special education majors, the Pearson PAPA tests: reading, writing, mathematics, and the Pearson PreK-4 test, and the Special Education PreK-8 test. The PAPA must be passed prior to enrolling in the early childhood education block or the special education block. Students who scored 500 or higher on each of the SAT writing, math, and reading segments will be exempt from taking the PAPA tests (must score 500 or more on all three tests: writing, math, and reading). Similarly, students taking the ACT and score a minimum of 22 in English and writing and a 21 in math will be exempt from taking the PAPA tests. For secondary education minors, the PAPA tests: reading, writing, and mathematics PAPA must be passed prior to enrolling in EDU 451 Teaching in the Secondary School. Early childhood/special education majors should complete the appropriate Pearson specialty area tests before student teaching. It is strongly suggested that secondary education minors complete the specialty area test before Fall Semester of the senior year. The qualifying scores are established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Westminsterís Department of Education provides assistance to prepare students for the Pearson and Praxis examinations.

 

What can you do with an Education degree?

Imagine yourself a preschool teacher, an elementary school teacher, a high school teacher, or a special education teacher in a public or private school.

Quick Facts


Education

Degree Offered

Bachelor of Arts


 

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