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Biochemistry

Course Descriptions

BIO 201 Cell Biology & Genetics (SD) (4.00 SH). This course serves as an introduction for students who have chosen biology or molecular biology as a major or minor. A combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and assignments will introduce students to ways of observing and thinking about fundamental concepts and processes in the following areas of biology—biochemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, genetics, and biotechnology. Various resources will be utilized to reinforce biological concepts, learn new laboratory skills, and improve critical thinking skills. Multiple sections offered every Fall Semester; one section offered every Spring Semester. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

BIO 301 Microbiology (4.00 SH). A study of the diversity in viruses, bacteria, fungi, and algae with an emphasis on the role of evolution in generating the diversity found in microorganisms. Consideration will be given to various energy metabolisms, genetic strategies, molecular systematics, and microbial adaptations that allow such diversity. Also considered will be the importance of microorganisms in medical, industrial, and environmental settings. A laboratory is included. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 201. Offered Spring Semester.

BIO 302 Cell & Molecular Biology (4.00 SH). A study of molecular structure and function in eukaryotic cells. Topics include organic molecules that contribute to cells the function of cells, membrane transport and signal transduction, gene expression, intracellular transport, structure and motility, energy conversions, tissue composition and cell division. Laboratory exercises will reinforce many of concepts covered in lecture. Required for the molecular biology major. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 201. Offered Fall Semester.

BIO 303 Molec Genet & Hered (4.00 SH). This course serves as a broad introduction to the structure and function of nucleic acids, processes that regulate expression of genetic information, and processes that direct inheritance of genetic information. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic organism will serve as model systems for studying topics such as nucleic acid structure, function, replication, damage, repair, and control of gene expression. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, Mendelian genetics, epigenetics, population genetics, and the genetics of cancer. Weekly laboratory exercises are an essential component of this class and will be used to explore various molecular and biochemical techniques for isolating, replicating and analyzing nucleic acid sequence as well as studying modes of inheritance. Required for the molecular biology major. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 201. Offered every other Spring Semester.

CHE 117 Principles of Chemistry (SD) (4.00 SH). A course emphasizing stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear phenomena, and interactions of science and society. In the laboratory program students will investigate chemical systems, analyze observations and data, devise explanations, and communicate results. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and an acceptable score on a placement test or completion of CHE 111 or ES 160 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

CHE 180 Inorganic Chemistry (4.00 SH). A study of the energetics of the bonding and reactions of inorganic compounds. Emphasis is given to the periodicity of the chemical and physical properties of the elements. Major themes of the course include effective nuclear charge, lattice energy, charge density, acid/base theories, and the descriptive chemistry of all of the elements. The laboratory includes the investigation of the energetics of reactions, the synthesis and analysis of coordination compounds, qualitative chemistry, and the communication of results. Prerequisite: CHE 117 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.

CHE 230 Chemical Analysis (4.00 SH). A study of the theoretical foundation and skills necessary for the solution of problems encountered in the area of quantitative chemical analysis, including classical and modern methods. Emphasis is given to the evaluation and presentation of data, sampling, equilibrium dynamics of analytically important reactions, experimental design, volumetric techniques, absorption and emission spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and analytical separations. Examples and laboratory exercises will include environmental air, soil and water systems. Prerequisites: CHE 117, and MTH 135, MTH 150 or BIO 206 (may be co-requisite) with grades of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters. (Also listed as ES 230.)

CHE 261 Organic Chemistry I (4.00 SH). An overview of organic chemistry. Organic molecules are compared by their functional group, focusing on nomenclature, physical properties, and the major chemical reactions used in synthesis and identification. Emphasis is also given to the areas of acidity, basicity, stereochemistry, aromaticity, and spectroscopy. Laboratory activities involve techniques for determination of physical and chemical properties, and methods of purification. Prerequisite: CHE 117 with a grade of C- or better. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.

CHE 331 Biophysical Chemistry (4.00 SH). Biophysical chemistry is a study of the macroscopic and microscopic behavior of matter, with a focus on biochemical systems. Topics include the application of the laws of thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanical models, and spectroscopy in the context of modern biochemistry/molecular biology.

CHE 381 Biochemistry Principles (4.00 SH). A study of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids in a biological context. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure and function of these biomolecules. Other topics include methodologies to analyze biomolecules, membranes, transport, kinetics, and biosignaling. Prerequisites: CHE 261 and BIO 201. Offered most semesters.

CHE 382 Metabolic Biochemistry (4.00 SH). A course examining the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and the flow of biological information in organisms in detail. Specific metabolic pathways and genetic informational flow in plants and animals will be addressed. Prerequisite: CHE 380. Offered Spring Semester, alternate years. Offered Spring Semester, alternate years.

CHE 383 Biochemistry Methods (4.00 SH). A laboratory approach to understanding biochemistry. The course uses methodologies including molecular cloning, protein expression, protein purification, enzyme characterization, and kinetics. Chromatography, spectroscopy, and electrophoresis techniques are utilized. Prerequisite: CHE 381 or CHE 384. Offered Spring semesters.

CHE 384 Biological Chemistry (4.00 SH). A study of the chemistry involved in biological processes and biomolecules. Emphasis is placed on the building of biomolecules from organic chemistry precursors. Biological function is introduced as a product of chemical structure. Prerequisites: CHE 261 and CHE 230. Offered once every four semester.

CHE 451 Advanced Lab: Synthesis & Analysis (4.00 SH). A project-oriented course that integrates advanced synthetic and analytical methodologies. Projects may include inorganic synthesis, multi-step organic synthesis, and analysis of samples using various spectroscopy and chromatography instrumentation. This course includes participation in a weekly seminar. Prerequisites: CHE 180, 230, 261. Offered fall semesters.

CHE 452 Advanced Lab: Research Methods (2.00 SH). A writing intensive course that teaches students to write like a chemist. This included writing a scientific research paper, a research proposal, and a research poster. Students participate in a pilot project to initiate their senior project and then write a proposal and poster based on this pilot project. This course includes participation in a weekly seminar. Prerequisites: CHE 180, CHE 230, and CHE 261. Offered Spring semesters.

CHE 600 Senior Research (2.00 SH). An independent senior project that integrates previously learned techniques in the investigation of a chemical problem. After conducting the project and completing data collection, the term ends with the preparation of the senior thesis. Prerequisite: CHE 352.

CHE 601 Capstone I: Professional Develop (2.00 SH). Activities and discussions centered on the transition of students to chemical professionals. This experience includes journal readings, exploration of careers and graduate and professional schools, field trips, summary papers and a service project. Additionally each student creates a portfolio of chemical accomplishments. Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered Fall Semester

CHE 602 Capstone II: Professional Perspect (2.00 SH). A discussion-centered course focusing on the development of science as a way of knowing; the role of chemistry in changing scientific paradigms; and the moral and ethical responsibilities of chemists. Students are also expected to articulate their thoughts through various short writing assignments. Additionally, students will take comprehensive chemistry examinations and participate in the weekly department seminar. Prerequisite: CHE 600 or CHE 620-624. Offered Spring Semester.

CHE 662 Honors Research (2.00 SH).

CHE 663 Honors Research (3.00 SH).

CHE 664 Honors Research (4.00 SH).

ES 230 Chemical Analysis (4.00 SH). A study of the theoretical foundation and skills necessary for the solution of problems encountered in the area of quantitative chemical analysis, including classical and modern methods. Emphasis is given to the evaluation and presentation of data, sampling, equilibrium dynamics of analytically important reactions, experimental design, volumetric techniques, absorption and emission spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and analytical separations. Examples and laboratory exercises will include environmental air, soil and water systems. Prerequisites: CHE 117, and MTH 135 or MTH 150 or BIO 206 (may be co-requisite). (Also listed as CHE 230.)

MTH 150 Calculus I (QR) (4.00 SH). This course will focus on the fundamentals of differential calculus. Topics considered include functions, limits, continuous functions, differentiation and integration of functions with one real variable, applications of differentiation and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will be introduced to some basic calculus proofs. This course is suggested for all students who expect to continue for any advanced degree including finance, law, and medicine. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 152 Calculus II (QR) (4.00 SH). This course will focus on the fundamentals of integral calculus, including techniques and applications of integration. Other topics include infinite series and introductory topics from differential equations. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 150 or the permission of the instructor. (Offered every semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

MTH 250 Calculus III (QR) (4.00 SH). An introduction to the calculus of several variables. Topics include the geometry of three-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: C- or better in MTH 152. (Offered Fall semester.) Meets Quantitative Reasoning Intellectual Perspective requirement (QR).

PHY 141 Foundations Physics I (SD) (4.00 SH). The first semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics) without calculus. Basic principles used in both semesters are introduced in the first semester. Some emphasis will be given to applications of physics to biological systems. A laboratory is included. Prerequisite: a good background in high school mathematics including algebra and trigonometry. Offered Fall Semester. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

PHY 142 Foundations Physics II (4.00 SH). The second semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics) without calculus. Some emphasis will be given to applications of physics to biological systems. A laboratory is included. Prerequisite: PHY 141 or PHY 151. Offered Spring Semester.

PHY 151 Principles Physics I (SD) (4.00 SH). The first semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics). Basic principles used in both semesters are introduced in the first semester. Some basic concepts of calculus may be introduced as needed. A laboratory is included. Co-requisite: MTH 150 or higher. Offered Fall Semester. Meets Scientific Discovery Intellectual Perspective requirement (SD).

PHY 152 Principles Physics II (4.00 SH). The second semester of an introductory study of physics (mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, waves, light and modern physics). Calculus methods will be used. A laboratory is included. Prerequisite: PHY 151; Co-requisite: MTH 152 or higher. Offered Spring Semester.

 

What can you do with a Biochemistry degree?

Imagine yourself a medical or dental professional, a biotechnologist, a pharmacist, a professor, or a research scientist.